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SYNTHETIC PHEROMONES DISRUPT MALE DIORYCTRIA SPP. MOTHS IN A LOBLOLLY PINE SEED ORCHARD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Gary L. DeBarr
Affiliation:
Southern Research Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, 320 Green Street, Athens, Georgia, USA 30602-2044
James L. Hanula*
Affiliation:
Southern Research Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, 320 Green Street, Athens, Georgia, USA 30602-2044
Christine G. Niwa
Affiliation:
Forestry Services Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, 3200 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, Oregon, USA 97331
John C. Nord
Affiliation:
Southern Research Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, 320 Green Street, Athens, Georgia, USA 30602-2044
*
1 Author to whom all corresponding should be addressed (E-mail: jhanula@fs.fed.us).

Abstract

Synthetic sex pheromones released in a loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L. (Pinaceae), seed orchard interfered with the ability of male coneworm moths, Dioryctria Zeller spp. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), to locate traps baited with sex pheromones or live females. Pherocon 1C® traps baited with synthetic pheromones or live conspecific females were hung near the center of two 1.2-ha circular plots during emergence of Dioryctria amatella (Hulst), Dioryctria disclusa (Heinrich), and Dioryctria merkeli (Mutuura and Munroe). In a paired design, trap catches for the mating-disruption treatment with synthetic pheromone dispensers consisting of three polyvinyl chloride rods placed in every tree were compared with the control treatment. Treatments were alternated at intervals of 2–3 d. Trap catches of D. amatella were reduced by 91% when plots were treated with 2.5 g/ha of Z-11-hexadencenyl acetate. Catches were reduced by 99.5% for D. disclusa and by 97% for D. merkeli when plots were treated with 12.5 g/ha of Z-9-tetradecenyl acetate, whereas catches of D. amatella were unaffected by this mating-disruption treatment. Daily disappearance of Z-9-tetradecenyl acetate from the dispensers averaged 0.46 g/ha or less. Manually placing dispensers on nylon lines in the tops of trees was an effective method for releasing synthetic Dioryctria pheromones in the orchard. These data suggest it may be feasible to prevent mating of Dioryctria spp. in pine seed orchards by using synthetic pheromones for mating disruption, but large-scale tests will be required to demonstrate cone protection.

Résumé

La libération de phéromones sexuelles synthétiques dans une plantation à semence de pins taeda, Pinus taeda L. (Pinaceae), entrave la capacité des mâles de Dioryctria Zeller spp. (Lepidoptera : Pyralidae) de localiser des pièges garnis de phéromones sexuelles ou de femelles vivantes. Des pièges Pherocon 1C® garnis de phéromones synthétiques ou de femelles vivantes conspécifiques ont été suspendus près du centre de deux enceintes circulaires de 1,2 ha pendant l’émergence de Dioryctria amatella (Hulst), Dioryctria disclusa (Heinrich) et Dioryctria merkeli (Mutuura et Munroe). Dans un montage pair, des pièges conçus pour perturber les accouplements ont été munis d’appareils dispensateurs de phéromone synthétique constitués de trois bâtonnets de chlorure de polyvinyl et placés dans chaque arbre pour fins de comparaison avec les témoins. Les traitements ont été administrés en alternance à intervalles de 2–3 jours. Les captures de D. amatella ont été réduites de 91% après administration de 2,5 g/ha d’acétate de Z-11-hexadécényle. Les captures de D. disclusa ont été réduites de 99,5% et celles de D. merkeli de 97% après traitement a 2,5 g/ha d’acétate de Z-9-décényle, enfin les captures de D. amatella sont demeurées inchangées après le traitement perturbateur des accouplements. La diminution d’acétate de Z-9-décényle dans les dispensateurs était en moyenne de 0,46 g/ha par jour ou moins. L’installation manuelle de dispensateurs le long de fils de nylon à la cime des arbres s’est avérée une méthode efficace de diffusion des phéromones synthétiques de Dioryctria spp. dans la plantation. Ces résultats indiquent qu’il est possible de perturber la reproduction de Dioryctria spp. dans les plantations de pins à semence en utilisant des phéromones synthétiques capables d’empêcher les accouplements, mais il faudra procéder à des tests sur une grande échelle pour démontrer que ce traitement protège les cônes.

[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2000

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