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Sap beetles (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) in managed and old-growth forests in southeastern Ontario, Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2012

Rebecca M. Zeran
Affiliation:
Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9
Robert S. Anderson
Affiliation:
Canadian Museum of Nature, P.O. Box 3443, Station D, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1P 6P4
Terry A. Wheeler*
Affiliation:
Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9
*
1 Corresponding author (e-mail: wheeler@nrs.mcgill.ca).

Abstract

Nitidulid beetles were sampled from old-growth and mature managed hemlock-hardwood forest stands in southeastern Ontario, Canada. Large-area flight-intercept traps and trunk-window traps were operated for 22 weeks in 2003 and yielded 2129 nitidulid beetles representing 30 species. Species richness was similar in both forest types but relative abundance was higher in managed stands. Other diversity measures (rarefaction-estimated species richness, Fisher's α, Simpson's index) were all higher in old-growth stands, and managed stands were separated from old-growth stands in cluster analyses based on overall species diversity. These results were strongly influenced by the dominance of Glischrochilus quadrisignatus (Say) in two managed stands; removal of that species from analyses resulted in higher species diversity in managed stands and no distinct separation of forest types in cluster analyses. Indicator species analysis showed that G. quadrisignatus and Pallodes pallidus (Palisot de Beauvois) were strongly associated with managed stands. Glischrochilus sanguinolentus (Olivier) was collected more frequently in trunk-window traps than in flight-intercept traps and data suggested a possible association of this beetle with old-growth stands. Pallodes pallidus and Cychramus adustus Erichson, both known to feed on fleshy white fungi, displayed a clear division in seasonal abundance peaks, suggesting that resource partitioning may be occurring.

Résumé

Nous avons échantillonné les coléoptères nitudilidés dans des sites forestiers de bois durs et de pruches, les uns naturels et anciens, les autres aménagés et matures, dans le sud-est de l'Ontario, Canada. Nous avons installé des pièges d'interception de vol de grande surface et des pièges fenêtres sur tronc pendant 22 semaines en 2003 qui ont récolté 2129 coléoptères nitudilidés représentant 30 espèces. La richesse spécifique est semblable dans les deux types de forêt, mais l'abondance relative est plus élevée dans les sites aménagés. Les autres mesures de la diversité (richesse spécifique estimée par raréfaction, α de Fisher, indice de Simpson) sont toutes plus grandes dans les sites anciens; les sites aménagés se séparent d'ailleurs tous des sites anciens dans les analyses de regroupement basées sur la diversité spécifique globale. Ces résultats sont fortement influencés par la dominance de Glischrochilus quadrisignatus (Say) dans deux des sites aménagés; le retrait de cette espèce des analyses donne une diversité spécifique plus élevée dans les sites aménagés et il supprime la séparation des types forestiers dans les analyses de groupement. Une analyse des espèces indicatrices montre que G. quadrisignatus et Pallodes pallidus (Palisot de Beauvois) sont fortement associés aux sites aménagés. Glischrochilus sanguinolentus (Olivier) se récolte plus fréquemment dans les pièges fenêtres sur tronc que dans les pièges à interception et les données indiquent une association possible de ce coléoptère avec les forêts anciennes. Pallodes pallidus et Cychramus adustus Erichson, qui sont tous deux connus pour se nourrir de champignons charnus blancs, possèdent des pics d'abondance saisonnière nettement distincts, ce qui laisse croire qu'il y a peut-être là une partition des ressources.

[Traduit par la Rédaction]

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Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2006

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