Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-89lq7 Total loading time: 0.386 Render date: 2022-06-27T03:28:30.126Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

HOST UTILIZATION BY COLORADO POTATO BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE) IN A POTATO/WEED (SOLANUM SARRACHOIDES SENDT.) SYSTEM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

David R. Horton
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA 80523
John L. Capinera
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA 32611

Abstract

A non-pest population of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), was monitored in the field and in the laboratory to define some cultural and host plant factors that might prompt increased use of potato by a population locally adapted to a wild host species (Solanum sarrachoides Sendt.). This study tested whether elimination of the beetle’s natural host from plots of potato would result in increased densities of beetles on potato, and examined whether beetles showed differences in performance on and in preference for S. sarrachoides or potato. In 2 years of study, egg densities on potato were higher in weed-free than weedy plots; paired preference tests in the laboratory also indicated that beetles deposited the most egg masses (92%) on S. sarrachoides. Densities of larvae and adults on potato were not affected by weed density. Growth rates of larvae were significantly faster on S. sarrachoides than on potato for both early-season (pre 7 July) and late-season (post 21 July) foliage. Survival and adult size were not affected by host species. In choice tests, late-instar larvae preferred S. sarrachoides to potato. Host preference of larvae varied with age of foliage, and S. sarrachoides became increasingly preferred later in the growing season.

Résumé

Nous avons suivi une population non-nuisible du doryphore de la pomme de terre, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), dans le champ et au laboratoire afin de définir certains facteurs culturaux et facteurs associés à la plante hôte qui pourraient causer une augmentation de l’utilisation de pommes de terre par une population localement adaptée à un hôte sauvage (Solanum sarrachoides Sendt.). Cette étude a vérifié si l’élimination de l’hôte naturel du doryphore de parcelles de pommes de terre résulterait en une augmentation des densités de doryphores sur les pommes de terre. Nous avons aussi tenté de déterminer si la performance du doryphore diffère sur S. sarrachoides et sur la pomme de terre, et si le doryphore affiche une préférence pour l’une ou l’autre plante. Au cours d’une étude d’une durée de 2 ans, les densités d’oeufs sur la pomme de terre étaient plus élevées dans les parcelles sans mauvaise herbe que dans celles avec mauvaises herbes; des tests de préférence paires au laboratoire ont également indiqué que les doryphores pondaient la majorité des masses d’oeufs (92%) sur S. sarrachoides. Les densités de larves et d’adultes sur les pommes de terre n’ont pas été affectées par la densité de mauvaises herbes. Le taux de croissance des larves était significativement plus élevés sur S. sarrachoides que sur la pomme de terre, et ce, sur le feuillage jeune (avant le 7 juillet) aussi bien que sur le feuillage vieux (après le 21 juillet). La survie et la taille des adultes n’ont pas été affectés par l’espèce de plante hôte. Dans des tests de préférence, des larves au développement avancé ont préféré S. sarrachoides à la pomme de terre. La préférence des larves envers la plante hôte a varié en fonction de l’âge du feuillage, et la préférence pour S. sarrachoides a augmenté en fin de saison.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Brown, J.J., Jermy, T., and Butt, B.A.. 1980. The influence of an alternate host plant on the fecundity of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Ann. ent. Soc. Am. 73: 197199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dixon, W.J. 1983. BMDP Statistical Software. Univ. Calif. Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
Futuyma, D.J., and Peterson, S.C.. 1985. Genetic variation in the use of resources by insects. A. Rev. Ent. 30: 217238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hare, J.D. 1983. Seasonal variation in plant–insect associations: utilization of Solanum dulcamara by Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Ecology 64: 345361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horton, D.R., and Capinera, J.L.. 1987. Effects of plant diversity, host density, and host size on population ecology of the Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Environ. Ent. 16: 10191026.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horton, D.R., Capinera, J.L., and Chapman, P.L.. 1988. Local differences in host use by two populations of the Colorado potato beetle. Ecology 69: 823831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hsiao, T.H. 1978. Host plant adaptations among geographic populations of the Colorado potato beetle. Entomologia Exp. Appl. 24: 237247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hsiao, T.H. 1982. Geographic variation and host plant adaptation of the Colorado potato beetle. pp. 315324in Visser, J.H., and Minks, A.K. (Eds.), Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Insect–Plant Relationships. Pudoc, Wageningen, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
SAS Institute. 1987. SAS/STAT Guide for Personal Computers, Version 6. Cary, NC.Google Scholar
Winer, B.J. 1971. Statistical Principles in Experimental Design, 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.Google Scholar
13
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

HOST UTILIZATION BY COLORADO POTATO BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE) IN A POTATO/WEED (SOLANUM SARRACHOIDES SENDT.) SYSTEM
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

HOST UTILIZATION BY COLORADO POTATO BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE) IN A POTATO/WEED (SOLANUM SARRACHOIDES SENDT.) SYSTEM
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

HOST UTILIZATION BY COLORADO POTATO BEETLE (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE) IN A POTATO/WEED (SOLANUM SARRACHOIDES SENDT.) SYSTEM
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *