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Further evidence that monochamol is attractive to Monochamus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) species, with attraction synergised by host plant volatiles and bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pheromones

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2014

Krista Ryall*
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service – Great Lakes Forestry Centre, 1219 Queen Street East, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada P6A 2E5
Peter Silk
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service – Atlantic Forestry Centre, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5P7
Reginald P. Webster
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service – Atlantic Forestry Centre, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5P7
Jerzy M. Gutowski
Affiliation:
European Centre for Natural Forests, Forest Research Institute, 17–230 Białowieża, Poland
Qingfan Meng
Affiliation:
College of Forestry, Beihua University, Jilin, China
Yan Li
Affiliation:
Beihua University, Jilin, China
Wentao Gao
Affiliation:
Beihua University, Jilin, China
Jeff Fidgen
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service – Great Lakes Forestry Centre, 1219 Queen Street East, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada P6A 2E5
Troy Kimoto
Affiliation:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5C 6S7
Taylor Scarr
Affiliation:
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada P6A 6B5
Vic Mastro
Affiliation:
United States Department of Agriculture, Centre for Plant Health Science and Technology, Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts 02542, United States of America
Jon D. Sweeney
Affiliation:
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service – Atlantic Forestry Centre, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5P7
*
1Corresponding author (e-mail: kryall@nrcan.gc.ca).

Abstract

Monochamol (2-undecyloxy-1-ethanol) is a male-produced aggregation pheromone for several Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) species. We conducted trapping experiments in Canada, Poland, and China to test whether monochamol was attractive to additional Monochamus species and if attraction was synergised by plant volatiles and bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pheromones. We provide the first evidence of attraction for M. urussovii (Fischer) and M. saltuarius (Gebler) to monochamol or monochamol+kairomones. The highest numbers of M. urussovii were captured in traps baited with monochamol+plant volatiles (Manuka oil, ethanol and (95/5±) α−pinene). Captures of M. saltuarius were highest in traps baited with monochamol, with the addition of cubeb oil tending to reduce captures. The highest numbers of M. scutellatus (Say) were captured in traps baited with monochamol+kairomones. A similar pattern in trap captures was found for M. notatus (Drury), M. marmorator Kirby, M. carolinensis (Olivier), and M. mutator LeConte. Detection rates, that is, proportion of traps capturing at least one specimen, was highest for traps baited with monochamol plus kairomones, particularly for less-common species. These results support the emerging hypothesis that pheromone compounds can attract related cerambycid species with cumulative evidence for attraction to monochamol for 12 species of Monochamus worldwide.

Type
Behaviour & Ecology
Copyright
© Entomological Society of Canada and HerMajesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Parts of this work were produced by U.S. Government employees and such parts are therefore not subject to copyright protection in the U.S. 2014 

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Footnotes

Subject Editor: Deepa Pureswaran

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