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FLY FAUNA OF BIRD NESTS IN HOKKAIDO, JAPAN (DIPTERA)1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Mitsuhiro Iwasa
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Entomology, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080, Japan
Koji Hori
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Entomology, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080, Japan
Noriyuki Aoki
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Entomology, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080, Japan

Abstract

The Diptera occurring in various kinds of bird nests were investigated in the Japanese island of Hokkaido from 1985 to 1989. A total of 4623 Diptera, consisting of 23 species of eight families (Anthomyiidae, Fannidae, Muscidae, Calliphoridae, Heleomyzidae, Sphaeroceridae, Sepsidae, and Stratiomyiidae), was reared from 69 natural nests of 13 bird species of eight families (Strigidae, Picidae, Paridae, Sittidae, Sturnidae, Ploceidae, Laniidae, and Columbidae). Of 23 species of flies reared, 12 were new records from bird nests. An ectoparasite of birds, Protocalliphora maruyamensis Shinonaga and Kano, frequently emerged from the nests of hole-nesting birds of Paridae, Sturnidae, and Ploceidae, but it did not emerge from the nests of the hole-nesting birds Picoides major and P. minor of Picidae. The nests of Streptopelia orientalis yielded the most species of flies (12). Myospila meditabunda (Fabricius) and Mydaea urbana (Meigen), whose larvae are predacious, proved able to live in the bird nests. Among the scavengers, Potamia littoralis (R.-D.) was the most dominant and occurred in the nests of nine of 10 hole-nesting bird species. Sphaerocerid, sepsid, and stratiomid flies occurred in the nests of S. orientalis in which large quantities of bird feces had accumulated. The factors concerning the occurrence of flies in the nests are discussed.

Résumé

Les diptères qui habitent dans divers types de nids d’oiseaux ont fait l’objet d’une investigation dans l’île d’Hokkaido. Japon, de 1985 à 1989. Au total. 4623 diptères appartenant à 23 espèces et huit familles (Anthomyiidae. Fannidae. Muscidae, Calliphoridae, Heleomyzidae, Sphaeroceridae, Sepsidae et Stratiomyiidae) ont été prélevés dans 69 nids de 13 espèces d’oiseaux appartenant a huit familles (Strigidae, Picidae, Paridae, Sittidae. Sturnidae, Ploceidae, Laniidae el Columbidae) et ils ont été mis en élevage. Des 23 espèces mises en élevage, 12 sont trouvées pour la première fois dans des nids d’oiseaux. Un ectoparasite des oiseaux, Protocalliphora maruyamensis Shinonaga et Kano, se retrouve souvent dans les nids de Paridae, Sturnidae et Ploceidae installés dans des cavités, mais pas chez les Picidae Picoides major ou P. minor qui nichent aussi dans des cavités. Ce sont les nids de Streptopelia orientalis qui ont donné le plus grand nombre d’espèces de diptères (12). Myospila meditabunda (Fabricius) et Mydaea urbana (Meigen), dont les larves sont prédatrices, sont capables de vivre aussi dans les nids d’oiseaux. Potamia littoralis (R.-D.) est l’espèce détritivore dominante et elle a été trouvée chez neuf des 10 espèces d’oiseaux qui nichent dans des cavités. Des sphaerocérides, des sepsides et des stratiomyides occupent les nids de S. orientalis dans lesquels s’accumulent des grandes quantités de fèces d’oiseaux. Les facteurs qui régissent la présence des diptères dans les nids sont examinés.

[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Type
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Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1995

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