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DISPERSAL OF TRYPODENDRON LINEATUM (OLIVIER) WITHIN A VALLEY SETTING

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

S.M. Salom
Affiliation:
Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1W5
J.A. McLean
Affiliation:
Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1W5

Abstract

A mark–recapture study examined Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier) spring flight dispersal in a coastal forested valley in British Columbia. Pheromone-baited traps were placed throughout the valley in five separate experiments. Recapture patterns of marked beetles were related to weather, topography, vegetative cover, and source of attractants.

Wind direction within the forest setting, 350 m from the closest open site, was quite variable with a beetle recapture pattern mat was non-directional. At a forest setting less than 50 m from an open site and road, diurnal up-valley winds resulted in an upwind beetle recapture pattern at 25 m from the release site. Beetles were recaptured at distances as far as 1.9 km downwind and 1 km upwind from the release site. Most beetles were recaptured within 2 h of release at distances up to 50 m. In traps at distances of 350–700 m, similar numbers of beetles were recaptured on the day of release as were recaptured during the following week. At distances greater than 1 km, almost all beetles took longer than 1 day to be recaptured.

Résumé

On a examiné le vol de dispersion printannière de Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier) par une étude de marquage–recapture dans une vallée côtière de la Colombie-Britannique. Des pièges appâtés de phéromone ont été disposés dans toute la vallée lors de plusieurs expériences distinctes. Les patrons de recapture des insectes marqués ont été reliés à la température, la topographie, le couvert végétal et la localisation de la source.

La direction du vent en forêt à 350 m de la clairière la plus proche était variable et produisait un patron de recapture non-directionnel. Dans un site forestier situé à moins de 50 m d’une clairière et d’une route, des vents diurnes remontant la vallée ont provoqué un patron de recapture à contre vent à 25 m du site de libération. Des insectes ont été capturés à des distances allant jusqu’à 1.9 km en aval, et jusqu’à 1 km en amont du site de libération. La plupart des insectes ont été recapturés moins de 2 h après leur libération, à des distances de 50 m ou moins. Dans des pièges situés de 350–700 m du site de libération, les nombres d’insectes capturés le jour même et au cours de la semaine suivante étaient similaires. A plus de 1 km de distance, plus de 1 jour s’est écoulé avant toute recapture.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1990

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