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COMPARISON OF TOPICALLY APPLIED RUBIDIUM CHLORIDE AND FLUORESCENT DYE MARKERS ON SURVIVAL AND RECOVERY OF FIELD-RELEASED MALE SPRUCE BUDWORM MOTHS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 May 2012

Larry R. Kipp
Affiliation:
EcoScience, Ltd. Site 21, Box 40, RR 12, Fredericton, New Brunswick, CanadaE3B 6H7
Greg C. Lonergan
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 6E1

Abstract

The influence of topical applications of fluorescent dyes or rubidium chloride (RbCl) solution, or both, on adult male spruce budworm longevity and attraction to and capture by pheromone-baited traps was investigated. Both marks persisted for at least 8 days in the field (duration of tests) and for at least 3 weeks in the laboratory. Recoveries of marked moths were similar to unmarked moths with respect to total recovery and timing and location (within the canopy) of recovery. The results validate the assumption implicit in previous mark–release–recapture studies on spruce budworm males that fluorescent dyes have no measurable effect on male trapping. A 0.41 M RbCl solution topically applied to laboratory-reared adult males is an efficient mass-marking technique for the spruce budworm.

Résumé

L’influence d’applications topiques de teintures fluorescentes ou de chlorure de rubidium (RbCl) en solution, ou des deux produits combinés, sur la longévité des mâles de la Tordeuse des bourgeons de l’épinette a été évaluée; l’influence des produits sur l’attirance des mâles vers des pièges appâtés au moyen de phéromones et sur leur capture dans ces pièges a également été déterminée. Les deux types de marqueurs persistaient durant au moins 8 jours en nature (durée des tests) et durant au moins 3 semaines en laboratoire. Il n’y avait pas de différence entre la proportion de tordeuses marquées et la proportion de tordeuses non marquées recapturées, de même qu’entre les moments et les lieux de capture (dans le feuillage) des tordeuses marquées et des tordeuses non marquées. Les résultats appuient la conclusion d’études antérieures de marquage–recapture de tordeuses mâles, conclusion selon laquelle l’utilisation de teintures fluorescentes n’a pas d’effet décelable sur la capture des mâles. L’application topique d’une solution 0,41 M de RbCl à des mâles de laboratoire est une technique de marquage de masse efficace chez la Tordeuse des bourgeons de l’épinette.

[Traduit par la rédaction]

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 1992

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COMPARISON OF TOPICALLY APPLIED RUBIDIUM CHLORIDE AND FLUORESCENT DYE MARKERS ON SURVIVAL AND RECOVERY OF FIELD-RELEASED MALE SPRUCE BUDWORM MOTHS
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COMPARISON OF TOPICALLY APPLIED RUBIDIUM CHLORIDE AND FLUORESCENT DYE MARKERS ON SURVIVAL AND RECOVERY OF FIELD-RELEASED MALE SPRUCE BUDWORM MOTHS
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COMPARISON OF TOPICALLY APPLIED RUBIDIUM CHLORIDE AND FLUORESCENT DYE MARKERS ON SURVIVAL AND RECOVERY OF FIELD-RELEASED MALE SPRUCE BUDWORM MOTHS
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