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Examining Ethics

Developing a Comprehensive Exam for a Bioethics Master’s Program

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 July 2014

Extract

The aim of this section is to expand and accelerate advances in methods of teaching bioethics. Bioethics educators are invited to send submissions to T. Kushner at kushnertk@gmail.com.

Type
Bioethics Education
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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