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End-of-Life Care in Turkey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2003

N. YASEMIN OGUZ
Affiliation:
N. Yasemin Oguz, M.D., Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Medical Ethics at the Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey
STEVEN H. MILES
Affiliation:
Steven H. Miles, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and Bioethics at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
NUKET BUKEN
Affiliation:
Nuket Buken, M.D., Ph.D., is Lecturer of Medical Ethics in the Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey
MURAT CIVANER
Affiliation:
Murat Civaner, M.D., Ph.D., is Lecturer of Medical Ethics in the Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey

Extract

Most physicians confront the moral and technical challenges of treating persons who are coming to the natural end of their lives. At the level of the health system, this issue becomes a more pressing area for reform as premature death decreases and more people live a full life span. Well-developed countries and international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) have made recommendations for improving healthcare problems in aging societies. Turkey belongs to the WHO and the OECD. This article describes end-of-life healthcare in Turkey, the design of the healthcare system to meet this need, challenges that should be addressed, and solutions that would be appropriate to Turkish culture and resources.

Type
SPECIAL SECTION: BIOETHICS NOW: INTERNATIONAL VOICES 2003
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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