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Decolonizing the Literature Classroom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2020

Abstract

What does it mean to decolonize the literature classroom? This short paper is intended as a personal reflection on teaching as an engagement with the social forces that bring neocolonial relations into the classroom, drawing on my experience teaching literature and literary theory in South Africa and Canada. I explore the idea of decolonizing the classroom as the production of an “outside” that provides meaning for the classroom’s “inside.”

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Articles
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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