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Bharati Mukherjee’s Jasmine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2016

Abstract

Bharati Mukherjee’s novel Jasmine works well in the multicultural North American classroom because it can inspire playful, mutually contradictory, inherently unstable readings. The novel must not be thought of as inviting one particular reading but as permitting student readers to find the potential for play in categories of identity that implicate them deeply.

Type
Explication de texte
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2016 

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References

1 Mukherjee, Bharati, Jasmine (Markham, Ontario: Penguin, 1990)Google Scholar.

2 Mohanty, Chandra Talpade, “Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses,” Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism, ed. Chandra Talpade Mohanty et al. (Bloomingtom IN: Indiana University Press, 1991), 5180 Google Scholar.

3 Sollors, Werner, Beyond Ethnicity: Consent and Descent in American Culture (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986)Google Scholar.

4 Said, Edward, The World, the Text, and the Critic (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1983)Google Scholar.

5 Schumpeter, Joseph A., Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy (New York: Harper, 1947)Google Scholar.

6 Fisher, Philip, Still the New World: American Literature in a Culture of Creative Destruction (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1999)Google Scholar.

7 Gleick, James, Chaos (New York: Viking, 1987)Google Scholar.

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