Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-wh2kg Total loading time: 0.271 Render date: 2022-06-26T22:36:18.423Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Guest Editors’ Introduction: Overlooked Thinkers: Stretching the Boundaries of Business Ethics Scholarship

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 September 2021

Andrew Wicks
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Lindsay Thompson
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University
Patricia Werhane
Affiliation:
University of Virginia DePaul University
Norman Bowie
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota

Abstract

This special issue is devoted to highlighting thinkers who have been overlooked within business ethics and who have important contributions to make to our field. We make the case that, as scholars of a hybrid discipline that also aims to address important issues of business practice, we need to look continually for new sources of insight and wisdom that can both enrich our discourse and improve our ability to generate ideas that have a positive impact on business practice. In this introductory essay, we discuss our rationale for creating this special issue, summarize the articles contained within, and close with thoughts on its significance for the field going forward.

Type
Special Issue
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Society for Business Ethics

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Business Roundtable. 2019. “One Year Later: Purpose of a Corporation.” https://purpose.businessroundtable.org/.Google Scholar
Crutzen, Paul J. 2006. “The ‘Anthropocene.’ ” In Earth System Science in the Anthropocene, edited by Ehlers, Eckart and Krafft, Thomas, 1318. Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dominguez, Juan F. 2015. “Toward a Neuroanthropology of Ethics: Introduction.” In Handbook of Neuroethics, 289–98. Dordecht: Springer Science.Google Scholar
Edelman. 2021. 2021 Edelman Trust Barometer. https://www.edelman.com/trust/2021-trust-barometer.Google Scholar
Freeman, R. Edward. 1994. “The Politics of Stakeholder Theory: Some Future Directions.” Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (4): 409–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gazzaniga, Michael S. 2005. The Ethical Brain. New York: Dana Press.Google Scholar
Glannon, Walter. 2018. The Evolution of Neuroethics. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
Guterres, Antonio. 2020. Sustainable Development Goals Report 2020. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
Huke, Nikolai, Clua-Losada, Mònica, and Bailey, David J.. 2015. “Disrupting the European Crisis: A Critical Political Economy of Contestation, Subversion and Escape.” New Political Economy 20 (5): 725–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jenkins, Willis. 2013. The Future of Ethics. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
Kelly, Clare, and O’Connell, Redmond. 2020. “Can Neuroscience Change the Way We View Morality?Neuron 108 (4): 604–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Koskenniemi, Martti. 2010. “Colonization of the ‘Indies’: The Origin of International Law.” In La idea de América en el pensamiento jus internacionalista del siglo XXI, 4363. Zaragoza: Institucion Fernando el Catolico.Google Scholar
Putnam, Robert D. 1995. “Bowling Alone: America’s Declining Social Capital.” Journal of Democracy 6 (1): 6578.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwab, Klaus. 2016. “The Fourth Industrial Revolution: What It Means and How to Respond.” In The Fourth Industrial Revolution: A Davos Reader, edited by Rose, Gideon, 311. Geneva: World Economic Forum.Google Scholar
Werhane, Patricia. 1991. “A Word from the Editor.” Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1): front matter.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Linked content

Please note a has been issued for this article.

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Guest Editors’ Introduction: Overlooked Thinkers: Stretching the Boundaries of Business Ethics Scholarship
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Guest Editors’ Introduction: Overlooked Thinkers: Stretching the Boundaries of Business Ethics Scholarship
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Guest Editors’ Introduction: Overlooked Thinkers: Stretching the Boundaries of Business Ethics Scholarship
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *