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Corporate responsibility, multinational corporations, and nation states: An introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Jennifer J. Griffin
Affiliation:
Strategic Management & Public Policy Department, The George Washington University, School of Business, Washington, DC, USA. E-mail: jgriffin@gwu.edu
Corresponding

Abstract

This special issue of Business and Politics examines how multinational corporations (MNCs) respond to the twin pressures of globalization and localization when implementing corporate responsibility (CR) policies. While MNCs are often viewed as agents of global economic integration, MNCs are impacted by globalization pressures, often in ways they cannot adequately control. As economies globalize, so do politics and stakeholder expectations that MNCs must negotiate as they manage their global operations. Working from the premise that CR strategies need to cohere with product and factor market strategies, the papers in this special issue make two contributions. First, they suggest that CR is an integral component of MNCs’ market and non-market strategies. Second, in addition to multi-domestic CR strategies, MNCs should consider international and global CR strategies as well.

Type
Introductory Essay
Copyright
Copyright © V.K. Aggarwal 2012 and published under exclusive license to Cambridge University Press 

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