Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-x7pwn Total loading time: 0.307 Render date: 2021-05-15T15:53:01.825Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

On some ‘editorial’ terms in the Mongol Ganjur

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 December 2009

Extract

The colophons of the Mongol Ganjur contain a large number of terms and expressions having to do with ‘writing’, ‘translation’, ‘revising’, ‘correcting’, ‘copying’, etc.; but, with these expressions appearing in almost numberless varieties of combinations with each other and with other words, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to assign a precise meaning to each particular one as distinct from the others. Some of these terms are synonyms and are used either together, or as substitutes one for the other, duplicating and repeating each other. The taste of the writers may very well have dictated the choice of one term in one place, and a different one, with roughly the same meaning, in another passage. The various ways in which these terms are combined and strung together, themselves strongly suggest that the Mongol translators, or the authors of the colophons, maintained no sharp distinction between the various terms: where is the precise line between ‘correcting’ and ‘revising’, ‘editing’, and ‘compiling’? Nevertheless, it should be possible to classify those expressions or terms into a few categories, even if there exists no clear line of demarcation between the various notions shading off into each other. I do not intend to trace such neat lines of separation, but I do believe that it is possible to define, if only in broad terms, the general meaning of the expressions concerned. And if carefully analysed and compared, these very words may tell us something about the manner in which the translation of the Buddhist sūtras was achieved.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © School of Oriental and African Studies 1980

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 de Jong, J. W., ‘Notes à propos des colophons du Kanǰur’, ZAS, VI, 1975, 520 (81), and 538 (849)Google Scholar.

2 Das, S. C., Tibetan-English Dictionary (p. 1072)Google Scholar: shu-wa: ‘to ask, to petition’; and under shu-dag: ‘improvement, correction, etc.’, he lists the expression shu-chen-gyi lo-tsa-wa ‘great reviser or commentator (of Sanskrit writings)’. Jäschke, , Tibetan–English Dictionary, 476Google Scholar. For lo-tsā-ba (= kelemürči) see below.

3 Peking, 1957, p. 326.

4 Brunnert, H. S. and Hagelstrom, V. V., Present day political organization of China (repr. 1962), 73, § 200AGoogle Scholar.

5 Wu-t'i Ch'ing-wen chien, loc. cit.

6 Brunnert-Hagelstrom, loc. cit.

7 Quoted from Legrand, J., L'Administration dans la domination Sino-Maiidchoue en Mongolie Qalq-a, Paris, 1976, 56Google Scholar. I have not seen the Mongol text. Brunnert-Hagelstrom, , op. cit., 23, § 94Google Scholar: ‘proof-reader’.

8 Sagaster, K., ‘Hat Č'os-kyi'od-zer die Pancaraksâ ins Mongolische übersetzt?’ in Olon ulusyn Mongolč erdemlnii II ix xural, vol. 2, Ulaanbaatar, 1973, 90 fGoogle Scholar.

9 Das, S. C., TED, 1222Google Scholar.

10 Serruys, Henry, ‘A Mongol lamaist prayer: Ündüsün bsang: “Incense offering of origin”’, Monumenta Serica, XXVIII, 1969, 361 (7:28), 378 (7), and noteGoogle Scholar.

11 Das, S. C., TED, 1080Google Scholar.

12 Sigülge- is the causative of sigü-; the nomen actoris in -či is usually formed with a noun, but can occasionally also be built from a verbal root. Cf. Mostaert, A. and Cleaves, Fr. W., ‘Trois documents mongols des archives secrètes vaticanes’, HJAS, XV, 1952, 461Google Scholar.

13 p. 771.

14 Poppe, N., Khalkha-Mongolisclie, Grammatik, Wiesbaden, 1951, § 116Google Scholar.

15 Secret history of the Mongols, § 56.

16 Ibid., § 254.

17 Wu-t'i Ch'ing-wen chien, 326.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

On some ‘editorial’ terms in the Mongol Ganjur
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

On some ‘editorial’ terms in the Mongol Ganjur
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

On some ‘editorial’ terms in the Mongol Ganjur
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *