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Divine procreation of the world in Zoroastrian Pahlavi texts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 December 2021

Amir Ahmadi*
Affiliation:
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Abstract

There are two schemes of creation in Zoroastrianism. According to one, Ohrmazd fashions the world in the manner of a skilful craftsman. According to the second, Ohrmazd gestates and gives birth to the world. This article is about the latter. The relevant Pahlavi texts are presented and discussed. The article argues that Pahlavi authors used macrocosm-microcosm correspondence theory to elaborate the doctrine from Avestan rudiments.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of SOAS University of London

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