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Variation in tospovirus transmission between populations of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

F. van de Wetering
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Virology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Binnenhaven 11, 6709 PD Wageningen, The Netherlands
M. van der Hoek
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Virology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Binnenhaven 11, 6709 PD Wageningen, The Netherlands
R. Goldbach
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Virology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Binnenhaven 11, 6709 PD Wageningen, The Netherlands
C. Mollema
Affiliation:
Department of Research Strategy (DLO), PO Box 59, 6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands
D. Peters*
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Virology, Wageningen Agricultural University, Binnenhaven 11, 6709 PD Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
* Fax: +317 484820 E-mail: dick.peters@medew.viro.wau.nl

Abstract

Fourteen populations of the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande, originating from different hosts and countries in Asia, Europe, North America and New Zealand, were analysed for their competency and efficiency to transmit tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). All populations acquired and subsequently transmitted the virus, and were thus competent to transmit. They show marked differences in their efficiency, expressed as the percentage of transmitting adults. Efficiencies varied from 18% for a F. occidentalis population from the USA (US2) to 75% for a population from Israel (IS2). The differences between populations were not affected by the amount of virus ingested or by the host plant used. However, the tospovirus species studied and age at which the larvae acquired the virus affected the efficiency to transmit. First instar larvae of the NL3 population from The Netherlands were able to acquire tomato spotted wilt virus, whereas second instar larvae failed to do so. However, both instars of this population acquired impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), another tospovirus. This and tomato spotted wilt virus were both acquired by both larval stages of the populations IS2 and US2, although their ability to acquire virus decreased with their age. Hence, it is likely that, in general, both instar larvae of most F. occidentalis populations are competent to acquire both tospoviruses. These results show that large differences exist in the efficiency by which tomato spotted wilt is transmitted by the various F. occidentalis populations and that the ability to acquire tospovirus decreases with the age of the larvae

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1999

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