Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-lmg95 Total loading time: 0.207 Render date: 2021-10-23T00:44:18.473Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Transect Fly-rounds in Field Studies of Glossina

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

J. Ford
Affiliation:
East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organisation.
J. P. Glasgow
Affiliation:
East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organisation.
D. L. Johns
Affiliation:
East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organisation.
J. R. Welch
Affiliation:
East African Trypanosomiasis Research Organisation.

Extract

The fly-round has for long been regarded as the most satisfactory way of following fluctuations in populations of tsetse flies (Glossina) and locating areas of concentration. It consists of a path cut through bush so as to traverse the principal vegetation communities and is divided into sections, corresponding to the latter, on each of which the flies are caught. A modification now widely used but not previously described in detail is termed a line transect or transect fly-round; this follows an arbitrary course along straight lines that may be orientated with regard to the topography and is divided into numerous short sections of equal length terminating at posts at which flies are caught. In its simplest form it follows a straight course, but various patterns are used including an angular spiral. It facilitates the collection of quantitative data on tsetse density and the factors (such as vegetation) that affect it, and their analysis is possible in more detail than was the case when the fly-round was laid out according to a pre conceived notion of vegetational relationships. This is illustrated by data from a fly-round at Shinyanga, Tanganyika, consisting of six sides, each of 2,000 yd., of two diagonally adjoining squares, that was divided originally into nine sections of varying lengths representing the floristic communities traversed, and subse quently into 120 sections each 200 yd. long. Comparison of the catches of non-teneral males of G. swynnertoni Aust. grouped according to the two methods emphasises the much greater detail provided by the second of them. The transect fly-round is easy to lay out and operate and is thought likely to be particularly useful in connection with reclamation work.

The effect of varying the section length was investigated for G. swynnertoni at Shinyanga, G. pallidipes Aust. in Nyanza Province, Kenya, and G. austeni Newst. in Zanzibar. With the first, progressively fewer flies of all categories except teneral males were caught as the section length was increased progressively from 50 to 200 yd.; with the other species a similar tendency was apparent, but not significant. The results emphasise a point long recognised but often neglected, that data from fly-rounds reflect, in part, the reaction of tsetse populations to the behaviour of the catching party. That this reaction, termed the availability, is itself inconstant is shown by catches of G. pallidipes on a fly-round done daily for a month, in which differences between catches on consecutive days, sometimes exceeding 3:1, must represent changes in availability, not in absolute population.

Data from the transect fly-round can be analysed so as to indicate sections where the catches deviate significantly from those expected on the assumption that they are distributed according to a Poisson series, and where there may thus be presumed to be areas of concentration of the population, or the reverse. A Table is provided to facilitate such analysis.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1959

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Buxton, P. A. (1955). The natural history of tsetse flies.—Mem. Lond. Sch. Hyg. trop. Med. no. 10, 816 pp.Google Scholar
Harrison, H. (1936). The Shinyanga game experiment: a few of the early observations.—J. Anim. Ecol. 5 pp. 271293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, C. H. N. (1937). Some new methods in the study of Glossina morsitcans.—Proc. zool. Soc. Lond. 1936 pp. 811896.Google Scholar
Jackson, C. H. N. (1955). The pattern of Glossina morsitans communities.—Bull. ent. Res. 46 pp. 517530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lloyd, LL., Johnson, W. B. & Rawson, P. H. (1927). Experiments in the control of tsetse-fly.—Bull. ent. Res. 17 pp. 423455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morison, C. G. T., Hoyle, A. C. & Hope-Simpson, J. F. (1948). Tropical soil-vegetation catenas and mosaics. A study in the south-western part of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.—J. Ecol. 36 pp. 184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Potts, W. H. (1930). A contribution to the study of numbers of tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans Westw.) by quantitative methods.—S. Afr. J. Sci. 27 pp. 491497.Google Scholar
Tansley, A. G. & Chipp, T. F. (1926). Aims and methods in the study of vegetation.—383 pp. London, Brit. Emp. Veg. Comm. & Crown Agents.Google Scholar
31
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Transect Fly-rounds in Field Studies of Glossina
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Transect Fly-rounds in Field Studies of Glossina
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Transect Fly-rounds in Field Studies of Glossina
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *