Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-vkn6t Total loading time: 0.361 Render date: 2022-08-11T15:06:51.609Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Population biology of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), in two potato cropping systems in Israel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

M. Coll*
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
S. Gavish
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel
I. Dori
Affiliation:
Hevel Maon, Regional Agricultural and Development Enterprises, M.P. Negev 85465, Israel
*
*Fax: +972 8 946 6768 E-mail: coll@agri.huji.ac.il

Abstract

The life cycle, within-field distribution, crop damage and impact of natural enemies of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) were investigated in two potato cropping systems. The two systems differed in soil type (sandy vs. loess) which in turn affected the choice of cultivars, irrigation programme, insecticide application method (ground vs. aerial), and planting and harvest times. From mid-April to the end of May, almost twice as many moths were caught in pheromone traps in sandy than in loess fields. Highest infestation of tubers was found before harvest, and infestation was greater in loess than in sandy fields. Larval densities in foliage and tubers were significantly higher at the margins of the fields than in the centre. A significant positive correlation was found between adult catch and larval infestation on foliage in sandy fields but not in loess. Tuber infestation in sand was positively correlated with foliage infestation. No such correlation was detected in loess. Five parasitic wasps emerged from P. operculella larvae collected from commercial fields and volunteer plants: Diadegma pulchripes (Kokujev) and Temelucha decorata, (Gravenhorst) (Ichneumonidae) and Bracon gelechiae Ashmead and two other unidentified Braconidae. The most abundant predators at the field site were Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus (Coccinellidae), Chrysoperla carneaStephens (Chrysopidae), Orius albidipennis (Reuter) (Anthocoridae) and four ant species (Formicidae). Parasitism rate reached 40% and predation was estimated at 79%. Results are discussed with regard to the development of an integrated pest management programme for this important pest.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abbas, M.S.T., Abuo Zeid, N.A. & Megahed, M.M. (1993) On the natural enemies of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella, in Egypt. Egyptian Journal of Agricultural Research 71, 943950.Google Scholar
Avidov, Z. (1961) Plant pests of Israel. 646 pp. Jerusalem, Israel, Magnes Press.Google Scholar
Berlinger, M.J. & Lebiush-Mordechi, S. (1997) The potato tubermoth in Israel. A review of its phenology, behaviour, methodology parasites and control. Trends in Entomology 1, 137155.Google Scholar
Das, G.P. & Raman, K.V. (1994) Alternate hosts of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella(Zeller). Crop Protection 13, 8386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foot, M.A. (1979) Bionomics of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) at Pukeohe. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 6, 623636.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilboa, S. (1989) Monitoring the potato tuber worm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) on processing tomatoes. MSc thesis, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
Gilboa, S. (1994) Evolution of host range and migration of an oligophagous pest, the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella.(Zeller). PhD thesis, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
Gilboa, S. & Podoler, H. (1994) Population dynamics of the potato tuber moth on processing tomato in Israel. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 72, 197206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Graf, J.E. (1917) The potato tuber moth.United States Department of Agriculture, Bulletin No. 427.Google Scholar
Kroschel, J. (1995) Integrated pest management in potato production in the Republic of Yemen. 227 pp. Margraf Verlag, Weikersheim.Google Scholar
Kroschel, J. & Koch, W. (1994) Studies on the population dynamics of the potato tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella) Zell. (Lep. Gelechiidae) in the Republic of Yemen. Journal of Applied Entomology 118, 327341.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lal, L. (1989) Relationships between pheromone catches of adult moths, foliar larval population and plant infestation by potato tuberworm in the field. Tropical Potato Management 35, 157159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meisner, J. (1969) Attraction and repellence in the potato tuber moth, Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.: phagostimulants and antifeedants for the larvae: some factors of the attraction to oviposition. PhD thesis, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
Porat, Z. (1983) The possibility of transferring resistance to the potato tuber moth from wild type to cultivated tomatoes. MSc thesis, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
Reed, E.M. (1971) Factors affecting the status of a virus as a control agent for the potato moth (Phthorimaea operculella (Zell.) (Lep., Gelechiidae)). Bulletin of Entomological Research 61, 207222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SAS Institute(1988) SAS/STAT user's guide, release 6.03 ed. Cary, North Carolina, SAS Institute.Google Scholar
Shelton, A.M. & Wyman, J.A. (1979) Time of tuber infestation and relationships between pheromone catches of adult moths, foliar larval population, and tuber damage by the potato tuberworm. Journal of Economic Entomology 72, 599601.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yathom, S. (1986) Phenology of the potato tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella), a pest of potatoes and processing tomatoes in Israel. Phytoparasitica 17, 313318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yathom, S., Berlinger, M.J., Dahan, R. & Voerman, S. (1979) Pheromone-baited traps as an aid in studying the phenology of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Zell.) in Israel. Phytoparasitica 7, 195197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zaki, F.N. (1989) Rearing of two predators, Orius albidipennis (Reut.) and Orius laevigatus (Fieber) (Hem., Anthocoridae), on some insect larvae. Journal of Applied Entomology 107, 107109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
36
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Population biology of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), in two potato cropping systems in Israel
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Population biology of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), in two potato cropping systems in Israel
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Population biology of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), in two potato cropping systems in Israel
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *