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Control of Humidity with Potassium Hydroxide, Sulphuric Acid, or other Solutions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

M. E. Solomon
Affiliation:
Department of Scientific & Industrial Research, Pest Infestation Laboratory, Slough, Bucks.

Extract

Methods of preparing solutions of graded density for the accurate control of atmospheric relative humidity are described, and some pitfalls in their use and in the use of saturated salt solutions are indicated.

For graded solutions of potassium hydroxide and of sulphuric acid, data from the International Critical Tables or more recent sources are used as the basis of tables giving the concentrations (wt.%) and densities corresponding to relative humidities in steps of 5 per cent. R.H. Sources of similar data for calcium chloride, sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride, and glycerol solutions are given.

As an addition to the compilation of the available data on humidities in contact with various saturated salt solutions by O'Brien (1948), some more recent figures are quoted.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1951

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References

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