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The Anopheles barbirostris group (Diptera, Culicidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

J. A. Reid
Affiliation:
Lately Senior Entomologist, Institute for Medical Research, Malaya.

Extract

The group of Anopheles barbirostris Wulp is shown to consist of some 11 closely similar species, five of which are described as new. Keys for identification are provided. The group is divisible into two parts, the subgroups of A. barbirostris and A. vanus Wlk.

Two (or possibly three) species in the barbirostris subgroup are disease vectors.

A. barbirostris sensu stricto is the commonest and most variable species of the group and has the widest range, occurring probably from India to the Moluccas excluding only Borneo and the Philippines. Larvae can be found in a variety of breeding places in still or slowly moving water. Throughout its range, except perhaps in the Celebes, it appears to be largely zoophilous and not a vector of disease.

A. campestris sp.n. is very closely related to barbirostris. It appears to be confined to the alluvial plains of coasts and deltas, and may be limited to the mainland of Asia. It is common on the west coast of the Malay Peninsula where it is anthropophilous and an important vector of human (and possibly also simian) malaria, and of filariasis due to the periodic form of Brugia malayi. It is probably at least a minor vector of malaria and filariasis in the plains of Thailand.

A. donaldi sp.n. is the principal member of the group in Borneo, and is locally common in Malaya where the larvae are usually found in more shaded places than those of barbirostris. In Borneo it is a minor vector of malaria and filariasis, and possibly in Malaya also.

A. franciscoi sp.n. is the Philippine representative of the barbirostris subgroup.

A. hodgkini sp.n. is widespread (Thailand, Indo-China, Malaya and Borneo), but seldom common. It is a species of the forest and forest edge.

A. pollicaris sp.n. is an uncommon but easily recognised forest species only known at present from Malaya.

The vanus subgroup consists for the most part of uncommon species having little contact with man and usually associated with forest. A. vanus sensu stricto occurs in the Celebes and Moluccas where it is common, and also in Borneo and the Philippines; A. barbumbrosus Strickl. & Chowd., replaces vanus in the western half of the archipelago and on the mainland; A. ahomi Chowd., is known from Assam; A. manalangi Mendoza is confined to the Philippines; finally there is an unnamed species in Ceylon with speckled legs which was previously identified wrongly as A. pseudobarbirostris Ludl.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1962

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