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The effects of a high-animal- and a high-vegetable-protein diet on mineral balance and bowel function of young men

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

W. Van Dokkum
Affiliation:
Department of Human Nutrition, TNO-CIVO Toxicology and Nutrition Institute, PO Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist, The Netherlands
Anneke Wesstra
Affiliation:
Department of Human Nutrition, TNO-CIVO Toxicology and Nutrition Institute, PO Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist, The Netherlands
R. Luyken
Affiliation:
Department of Human Nutrition, TNO-CIVO Toxicology and Nutrition Institute, PO Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist, The Netherlands
R. J. J. Hermus
Affiliation:
Department of Human Nutrition, TNO-CIVO Toxicology and Nutrition Institute, PO Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist, The Netherlands
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Abstract

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1. Twelve young men were given for periods of 20 d, each of three mixed diets, namely a low-protein (LP) diet (9% total energy as protein, 67% of animal origin), a high-animal-protein (HA) diet (16% total energy as protein, 67% of animal origin) and a high-vegetable-protein (HV) diet (16% total energy as protein, 67% of vegetable origin). Retention of calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc and copper as well as various bowel function indices were investigated during each dietary period.

2. Neither the HA diet nor the HV diet changed the retention of the minerals considerably. Only Fe balance decreased significantly on the HV diet.

3. Substituting the HV diet for the HA diet resulted in significant increases in faecal wet weight (17 g/d), defaecation frequency (0.12 stools/d), faecal volatile fatty acids (2.6 mmol/d) and a decrease in faecal bile acids (128 μmol/d).

4. It is concluded that a HV diet, rather than a HA diet is to be recommended with respect to bowel function, whereas the HV diet does not necessarily have a significant influence on mineral retention.

Type
Papers of direct relevance to Clinical and Human Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1986

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