Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-n4bck Total loading time: 0.367 Render date: 2022-08-13T21:58:36.655Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Effect of a mixture of conjugated linoleic acid isomers on growth performance and antibody production in broiler chicks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Kazuaki Takahashi*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiya-machi 1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, 981-8555, Japan
Yukio Akiba
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiya-machi 1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, 981-8555, Japan
Toshio Iwata
Affiliation:
Rinoru Oil Mills Co., Tokyo, Japan
Masaaki Kasai
Affiliation:
Rinoru Oil Mills Co., Tokyo, Japan
*
*Corresponding Author: Dr Kazuaki Takahashi, fax +81 22 717 8691, email taka@bios.tohoku.ac.jp
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

The effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers mixture on antibody titres against sheep blood erythrocytes (SRBC) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G concentration in plasma was studied in broiler chickens. In experiment 1, male and female broiler chicks (11 d of age, Cobb strain) were fed a diet supplemented with 10 g CLA or 10 g safflower-seed oil/kg diet for 2 weeks. An SRBC suspension (5:100, v/v) in a phosphate buffer was intravenously injected at 18 d of age and a blood sample was taken from the wing vein at 25 d of age. Chicks fed the CLA-supplemented diet had enhanced first antibody titres in plasma to SRBC as compared with those fed the safflower-seed oil-supplemented diet, irrespective of sex differences. In experiment 2, male broiler chicks (8 d of age, Ross strain) were fed a basal diet or a diet containing 10 g CLA/kg diet for 3 weeks. CLA in the CLA diet partially replaced the soyabean oil in the basal diet. The SRBC suspension was intravenously injected at 15 and 25 d of age and a blood sample was obtained at 21 and 29 d of age. The first antibody titres against SRBC were higher in chicks fed the CLA diet than those in chicks fed the basal diet, but the second titres were not. Plasma IgG concentrations in chicks fed the CLA diet were higher than those in chicks fed the basal diet on both sampling days. The results showed that dietary CLA enhanced antibody production in broiler chickens.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2003

References

Chew, BP, Wong, TS, Shultz, TD & Magnuson, N (1997) Effects of conjugated dienoic derivatives of linoleic acid and beta-carotene in modulating lymphocyte and macrophage function. Anticancer Research 17 10991106.Google ScholarPubMed
Chin, SF, Storkson, JM, Albright, KJ, Cook, ME & Pariza, MW (1994) Conjugated linoleic acid is a growth factor for rats as shown by enhanced weight gain and improved feed efficiency. Journal of Nutrition 124 23442349.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cook, ME, Miller, CC, Park, Y & Pariza, M (1993) Immune modulation by altered nutrient metabolism: nutritional control of immune-induced growth depression. Poultry Science 72 13011305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Du, M & Ahn, DU (2002) Effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on the growth rate of live birds and the abdominal fat content and quality of broiler meat. Poultry Science 81 428433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
DeLany, JP, Blohm, F, Truett, AA, Scimeca, JA & West, DB (1999) Conjugated linoleic acid rapidly reduces body fat content in mice without affecting energy intake. American Journal of Physiology 276 R1172R1179.Google ScholarPubMed
Dugan, MER, Alhus, JL, Schaefer, AL & Kramer, JKG (1997) The effect of conjugated linoleic acid on fat to lean repartitioning and feed conversion in pigs. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 77 723725.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fritsche, J & Steinhart, H (1998) Analysis, occurrence, and physiological properties of trans fatty acids (TFA) with particular emphasis on conjugated linoleic isomers (CLA) – a review. Fett Wissenschaft Technologie 100 190220.Google Scholar
Fritsche, KL, Cassity, NA & Waksmann, BH (1991) Effect of dietary fat source on antibody production and lymphocyte proliferation in chickens. Poultry Science 70 611617.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grimble, RF (1998) Dietary lipids and the inflammatory response. Proceeding of the Nutrition Society 57 535542.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hayek, MG, Han, SN, Wu, D, Watkins, BA, Meydan, M, Dorsey, JL, Smith, DE & Meydani, SN (1999) Dietary conjugated linoleic acid influences the immune response of young and old C57BL/6NCrlBR mice. Journal of Nutrition 129 3238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Isakov, N, Feldmann, M & Segal, S (1982) The mechanism of modulation of humoral immune responses after injection of mice with lactic dehydrogenase virus. Journal of Immunology 128 969975.Google Scholar
Japanese Feeding Standard for Poultry (1997) Japanese Feeding Standard for Poultry [Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Research Council Secretariat, editors]. Tokyo, Japan: Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Research Council Secretariat.Google Scholar
Koga, T, Nonaka, M, Gu, JY & Sugano, M (1997) Linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids differently modify the effects of elaidic acid on polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and some immune indices in rats. British Journal of Nutrition 77 645656.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Li, Y & Watkins, BA (1998) Conjugated linoleic acids alters bone fatty acid composition and reduce ex vivo prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis in rats fed n-6 or n-3 fatty acids. Lipids 33 417425.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, KL & Belury, MA (1998) Conjugated linoleic acid reduces arachidonic acid content and PGE2 synthesis in murine keratinocytes. Cancer Letters 127 1522.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miller, CC, Park, Y, Pariza, MW & Cook, ME (1994) Feeding conjugated linoleic acid to animals partially overcomes catabolic responses due to endotoxin injection. Biochemical and Biophysics Research Communication 198 11071112.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ostrowska, E, Muralitharan, M, Cross, RF, Bauman, DE & Dunshea, FR (1999) Dietary conjugated linoleic acids increase lean tissue and decrease fat deposition in growing pigs. Journal of Nutrition 129 20372042.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pariza, MW, Park, Y & Cook, ME (2000) Mechanisms of action of conjugated linoleic acid: evidence and speculation. Proceedings of Society Experimental Biology and Medicine 223 813.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pariza, MW, Park, Y & Cook, ME (2001) The biologically active isomers of conjugate linoleic acid. Progress in Lipid Research 40 283298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Park, Y, Albright, KJ, Storkson, JM, Cook, ME & Pariza, MW (1997) Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on body composition in mice. Lipids 32 853858.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stangl, GI (2000) Conjugated linoleic acids exhibit a strong fat to lean partitioning effect, reduce serum VLDL lipids and redistribute tissue lipids in food-restricted rats. Journal of Nutrition 130 11401146.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sugano, M, Tsujita, A, Yamasaki, M, Noguchi, M & Yamada, K (1998) Conjugated linoleic acid modulates tissue levels of chemical mediators and immunoglobulins in rats. Lipid 33 521527.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Szymczyk, B, Pisulewski, PM, Szczurek, W & Hanczakowski, P (2001) Effects of conjugated linoleic acid on growth performance, feed conversion efficiency, and subsequent carcass quality in broiler chickens. British Journal of Nutrition 85 465473.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Takahashi, K, Kawamata, K, Akiba, Y, Iwata, T & Kasai, M (2002) Influence of dietary conjugated linoleic acid isomers on early inflammatory responses in male broiler chickens. British Poultry Science 43 4753.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Turek, JJ, Li, Y, Schoenlein, IA, Allen, KGD & Watkins, BA (1998) Modulation of macrophage cytokine production by conjugated linoleic acids is influenced by the dietary n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry 9 258266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van der Zijpp, AJ, Scott, TR & Glick, B (1986) The effect of different routes of antigen administration on the humoral immune response of the chick. Poultry Science 65 809811.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
West, DB, DeLany, JP, Camet, PM, Blohm, F, Truett, AA & Scimeca, BA (1998) Effects of conjugated linoleic acid on body fat and energy metabolism in mice. American Journal of Physiology 144 R667R672.Google Scholar
Whigham, LD, Higbee, A, Bjorling, DE, Park, Y, Pariza, MW & Cook, ME (2002) CLA reduces antigen-induced eicosanoid release in conjugated linoleic acid-fed guinea pigs. American Journal of Physiology 282 R1104R1112.Google ScholarPubMed
Wong, MW, Chew, BP, Wong, TS, Hosick, HL & Shultz, TD (1997) Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on lymphocyte function and growth of mammary tumors in mice. Anticancer Research 17 987993.Google ScholarPubMed
Yamasaki, M, Kishihara, K, Mansho, K, Ogino, Y, Kasai, M, Sugano, M, Tachibana, H & Yamada, K (2000) Dietary effect of conjugated linoleic acid increases immunoglobulin productivity of Sprague-Dawley rat spleen lymphocytes. Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry 64 21592164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access
20
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effect of a mixture of conjugated linoleic acid isomers on growth performance and antibody production in broiler chicks
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Effect of a mixture of conjugated linoleic acid isomers on growth performance and antibody production in broiler chicks
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Effect of a mixture of conjugated linoleic acid isomers on growth performance and antibody production in broiler chicks
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *