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Effect of 4-coumaric and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid on oxidative DNA damage in rat colonic mucosa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Francesco Guglielmi*
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, University of Florence, viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy
Cristina Luceri
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, University of Florence, viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy
Lisa Giovannelli
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, University of Florence, viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy
Piero Dolara
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, University of Florence, viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy
Maura Lodovici
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, University of Florence, viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy
*
*Corresponding Author: Dr Francesco Guglielmi, fax +39 055 4271280, email francesco.guglielmi@unifi.it
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Abstract

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The effect of 4-coumaric and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic (protocatechuic) acid on the basal oxidative DNA damage of rat colonic mucosa in vivo was studied, relative to vitamin E. F344 rats were treated with 4-coumaric or protocatechuic acid mixed in the diet (25 or 50 mg/kg for 2 weeks). It was observed that 4-coumaric acid (50 mg/kg) significantly decreased the basal level of the oxidative damage assessed as 8-OH-2′-deoxyguanosine levels in DNA and by the comet assay. Moreover, it was found that vitamin E (10 mg/kg) had no effect on colonic mucosa oxidation damage, whereas at a higher dose (55 mg/kg) it actually enhanced oxidative stress. The effect of 4-coumaric acid (50 mg/kg) on the expression of some glutathione-related enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-P, GST-M2, GST-M1, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, glutathione peroxidase (GSPX)1 and GSPX4) was also investigated at the level of the colonic mucosa. Only the expression of GST-M2 was significantly induced by 4-coumaric acid, while protocatechuic acid was inactive. The data suggest that 4-coumaric acid acts as an antioxidant in the colonic mucosa in vivo.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2003

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