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Relationship between seaweeds consumption and hyperuricaemia in general adults: a Population-based study from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIH) cohort study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2021

Tingjing Zhang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Yawen Wang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Yeqing Gu
Affiliation:
Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, China
Ge Meng
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China Department of Toxicology and Sanitary Chemistry, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Qing Zhang
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Li Liu
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Hongmei Wu
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Shunming Zhang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Xuena Wang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Shaomei Sun
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Xing Wang
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Ming Zhou
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Huanli Jiao
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Qiyu Jia
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Kun Song
Affiliation:
Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Yuntang Wu
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Xiao-Hui Wu
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China
Kaijun Niu
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, 22 Qixiangtai Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300070, People’s Republic of China Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environment, Nutrition and Public Health, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Center for International Collaborative Research on Environment, Nutrition and Public Health, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Corresponding
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Abstract

Seaweeds have numerous biologically active ingredients, such as polysaccharides, polyphenols and carotenoids, that are beneficial to human health. Although these benefits might be related to the synthesis, secretion or reabsorption of uric acid, no studies have explored the relationship between seaweeds consumption and hyperuricaemia (HUA) in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate whether seaweeds consumption is related to HUA in a large-scale adult population. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 32 365 adults (17 328 men and 15 037 women) in Tianjin, People’s Republic of China. Frequency of seaweeds consumption was assessed by a validated self-administered FFQ. HUA was defined as serum uric acid levels >420 μmol/L in men and >350 μmol/L in women. The association between seaweeds consumption and HUA was assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Restricted cubic spline functions were used for non-linearity tests. The prevalence of HUA in men and women was 21·17 % and 5·93 %, respectively. After adjustments for potential confounding factors, the OR (95 % CI) for HUA across seaweed consumption (g/1000 kcal per d) were 1·00 (reference) for level 1, 0·91 (95 % CI 0·81, 1·02) for level 2; 0·90 (95 % CI 0·81, 1·01) for level 3; 0·86 (95 % CI 0·78, 0·97) for level 4 in men and 0·90 (95 % CI 0·73, 1·10) for level 2; 0·82 (95 % CI 0·67, 1·00) for level 3; 0·84 (95 % CI 0·68, 1·03) for level 4 in women, respectively. A negative correlation between seaweeds consumption and HUA in males but not in females was observed. Further studies are needed to explore the causal relationship.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work.

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Relationship between seaweeds consumption and hyperuricaemia in general adults: a Population-based study from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIH) cohort study
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