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Maternal and child fatty acid desaturase genotype as determinants of cord blood long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) concentrations in the Seychelles Child Development Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2021

Marie C. Conway
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Emeir M. McSorley
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Maria S. Mulhern
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Toni Spence
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Maria Weslowska
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
J. J. Strain
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Edwin van Wijngaarden
Affiliation:
School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, USA
Phil W. Davidson
Affiliation:
School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, USA
Gary J. Myers
Affiliation:
School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, USA
Karin E. Wahlberg
Affiliation:
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Conrad F. Shamlaye
Affiliation:
Ministry of Health, Mahé, Seychelles
Diego F. Cobice
Affiliation:
Mass Spectrometry Centre, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute (BMSRI), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Barry W. Hyland
Affiliation:
Mass Spectrometry Centre, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute (BMSRI), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
Daniela Pineda
Affiliation:
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Karin Broberg
Affiliation:
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Alison J. Yeates*
Affiliation:
Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), Ulster University, Coleraine, UK
*
*Corresponding author: A. J. Yeates, email a.yeates@ulster.ac.uk

Abstract

Optimal maternal long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) status is essential for the developing fetus. The fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genes are involved in the endogenous synthesis of LCPUFA. The minor allele of various FADS SNP have been associated with increased maternal concentrations of the precursors linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA), and lower concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA) and DHA. There is limited research on the influence of FADS genotype on cord PUFA status. The current study investigated the influence of maternal and child genetic variation in FADS genotype on cord blood PUFA status in a high fish-eating cohort. Cord blood samples (n 1088) collected from the Seychelles Child Development Study (SCDS) Nutrition Cohort 2 (NC2) were analysed for total serum PUFA. Of those with cord PUFA data available, maternal (n 1062) and child (n 916), FADS1 (rs174537 and rs174561), FADS2 (rs174575), and FADS1-FADS2 (rs3834458) were determined. Regression analysis determined that maternal minor allele homozygosity was associated with lower cord blood concentrations of DHA and the sum of EPA + DHA. Lower cord blood AA concentrations were observed in children who were minor allele homozygous for rs3834458 (β = 0·075; P = 0·037). Children who were minor allele carriers for rs174537, rs174561, rs174575 and rs3834458 had a lower cord blood AA:LA ratio (P < 0·05 for all). Both maternal and child FADS genotype were associated with cord LCPUFA concentrations, and therefore, the influence of FADS genotype was observed despite the high intake of preformed dietary LCPUFA from fish in this population.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Maternal and child fatty acid desaturase genotype as determinants of cord blood long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) concentrations in the Seychelles Child Development Study
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