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Increased vegetable and fruit intake is associated with reduced failure rate of tuberculosis treatment: a hospital-based cohort study in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2020

Lei Xu
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Jinyu Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Shanliang Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Linyi People’s Hospital East Branch, Linyi, Shandong, 276000, People’s Republic of China
Jianwen Zhang
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Ke Xiong
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Jing Cai
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Qiuzhen Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Song Lin
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Yan Ma
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
Aiguo Ma*
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266021, People’s Republic of China
*
* Corresponding author: Professor Aiguo Ma, email magfood@qdu.edu.cn

Abstract

Increased intake of vegetables and fruits has been associated with reduced risk of tuberculosis infection. Vegetables and fruits exert immunoregulatory effects; however, it is not clear whether vegetables and fruits have an adjuvant treatment effect on tuberculosis. Between 2009 and 2013, a hospital-based cohort study was conducted in Linyi, Shandong Province, China. Treatment outcome was ascertained by sputum smear and chest computerised tomography, and dietary intake was assessed by a semi-quantitative FFQ. The dietary questionnaire was conducted at the end of month 2 of treatment initiation. Participants recalled their dietary intake of the previous 2 months. A total of 2309 patients were enrolled in this study. After 6 months of treatment, 2099 patients were successfully treated and 210 were uncured. In multivariate models, higher intake of total vegetables and fruits (OR 0·70; 95 % CI 0·49, 0·99), total vegetables (OR 0·68; 95 % CI 0·48, 0·97), dark-coloured vegetables (OR 0·61; 95 % CI 0·43, 0·86) and light-coloured vegetables (OR 0·67; 95 % CI 0·48, 0·95) were associated with reduced failure rate of tuberculosis treatment. No association was found between total fruit intake and reduced failure rate of tuberculosis treatment (OR 0·98; 95 % CI 0·70, 1·37). High intake of total vegetables and fruits, especially vegetables, is associated with lower risk of failure of tuberculosis treatment in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The results provide important information for dietary guidelines during tuberculosis treatment.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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