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Effects of guanidinoacetic acid and coated folic acid supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestion and hepatic gene expression in Angus bulls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2020

Y. J. Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
J. Z. Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
D. H. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
M. J. Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
C. Zheng
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
Z. Z. Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
C. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
Q. Liu*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
J. Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
G. Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
W. J. Huo
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu, Shanxi Province, 030801, People’s Republic of China
*
*Corresponding author: Q. Liu, fax +86 0354 628 8335, email liuqiangabc@163.com

Abstract

To evaluate the impacts of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and coated folic acid (CFA) on growth performance, nutrient digestion and hepatic gene expression, fifty-two Angus bulls were assigned to four groups in a 2 × 2 factor experimental design. The CFA of 0 or 6 mg/kg dietary DM folic acid was supplemented in diets with GAA of 0 (GAA−) or 0·6 g/kg DM (GAA+), respectively. Average daily gain (ADG), feed efficiency and hepatic creatine concentration increased with GAA or CFA addition, and the increased magnitude of these parameters was greater for addition of CFA in GAA− diets than in GAA+ diets. Blood creatine concentration increased with GAA or CFA addition, and greater increase was observed when CFA was supplemented in GAA+ diets than in GAA− diets. DM intake was unchanged, but rumen total SCFA concentration and digestibilities of DM, crude protein, neutral-detergent fibre and acid-detergent fibre increased with the addition of GAA or CFA. Acetate:propionate ratio was unaffected by GAA, but increased for CFA addition. Increase in blood concentrations of albumin, total protein and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was observed for GAA or CFA addition. Blood folate concentration was decreased by GAA, but increased with CFA addition. Hepatic expressions of IGF-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, protein kinase B, mammalian target of rapamycin and ribosomal protein S6 kinase increased with GAA or CFA addition. Results indicated that the combined supplementation of GAA and CFA could not cause ADG increase more when compared with GAA or CFA addition alone.

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Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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