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Dietary patterns and sarcopenia in elderly adults: the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIH) study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2021

Xuena Wang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Mingxu Ye
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Yeqing Gu*
Affiliation:
Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Xiaohui Wu
Affiliation:
College of Pharmacy, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Ge Meng
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Department of Toxicology and Sanitary Chemistry, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Shanshan Bian
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Hongmei Wu
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Shunming Zhang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Yawen Wang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Tingjing Zhang
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Jie Cheng
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Shinan Gan
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Tong Ji
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Kaijun Niu*
Affiliation:
Nutritional Epidemiology Institute and School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Health Management Centre, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environment, Nutrition and Public Health, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Center for International Collaborative Research on Environment, Nutrition and Public Health, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
*
*Correspondence author: Kaijun Niu, email nkj0809@gmail.com; Yeqing Gu, email gyq900916@163.com
*Correspondence author: Kaijun Niu, email nkj0809@gmail.com; Yeqing Gu, email gyq900916@163.com

Abstract

Sarcopenia is a core contributor to several health consequences, including falls, fractures, physical limitations and disability. The pathophysiological processes of sarcopenia may be counteracted with the proper diet, delaying sarcopenia onset. Dietary pattern analysis is a whole diet approach used to investigate the relationship between diet and sarcopenia. Here, we aimed to investigate this relationship in an elderly Chinese population. A cross-sectional study with 2423 participants aged more than 60 years was performed. Sarcopenia was defined based on the guidelines of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia, composed of low muscle mass plus low grip strength and/or low gait speed. Dietary data were collected using a FFQ that included questions on 100 food items along with their specified serving sizes. Three dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis: sweet pattern, vegetable pattern and animal food pattern. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 16·1 %. The higher vegetable pattern score and animal food pattern score were related to lower prevalence of sarcopenia (Ptrend = 0·006 and < 0·001, respectively); the multivariate-adjusted OR of the prevalence of sarcopenia in the highest v. lowest quartiles were 0·54 (95 % CI 0·34, 0·86) and 0·50 (95 % CI 0·33, 0·74), separately. The sweet pattern score was not significantly related to the prevalence of sarcopenia. The present study showed that vegetable pattern and animal food pattern were related to a lower prevalence of sarcopenia in Chinese older adults. Further studies are required to clarify these findings.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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