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Contribution of home availability, parental child-feeding practices and health beliefs on children’s sweets and salty snacks consumption in Europe: Feel4Diabetes-Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2021

Maria Michelle Papamichael
Affiliation:
Department of Dietetics, Nutrition and Sport, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, Kallithea, Athens, 17671, Greece
Eva Karaglani
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, Kallithea, Athens, 17671, Greece
Kalliopi Karatzi
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens 11855, Greece
Violeta Iotova
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Varna, Varna, Bulgaria
Jemina Kivelä
Affiliation:
Population Health Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
Greet Cardon
Affiliation:
Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
Flore De Vylder
Affiliation:
Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
Yuliya Bazdarska
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Varna, Varna, Bulgaria
Roumyana Dimova
Affiliation:
Department of Diabetology, Clinical Centre of Endocrinology, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria
Esther González-Gil
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, Instituto de Nutrición y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Center of Biomedical Research (CIBM), Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
Paloma Flores-Barrantes
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
Stavros Liatis
Affiliation:
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Medical School, First Department of Propaedeutic Medicine, Laiko Gnenral Hospital, Athens, Greece
Luis Moreno
Affiliation:
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain
Konstantinos Makrilakis
Affiliation:
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Medical School, First Department of Propaedeutic Medicine, Laiko Gnenral Hospital, Athens, Greece
Yannis Manios*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, Kallithea, Athens, 17671, Greece Institute of Agri-food and Life Sciences, Hellenic Mediterranean University Research Centre, Heraklion, Greece
*
*Corresponding author: Professor Yannis Manios, fax +30 210 9549141, email manios@hua.gr

Abstract

Adoption of healthy dietary and snacking habits could support optimum physical and mental development in children as they define health in adulthood. This study assessed parameters associated with children’s snacking such as food home availability, parenting practices, and parents’ health beliefs. In this cross-sectional study 12 039 children, 49·4% boys 5–12 years, participating in the European Feel4Diabetes-Study were included. Children’s weekly consumption of sweets and salty snacks, home availability of snacks, food parenting practices, and health beliefs were assessed via questionnaires. Logistic regression was applied to explore associations of a) home availability of snacks, b) food parenting practices (permissiveness and rewarding with snacks) and c) parent’s opinions on deterministic health beliefs with children’s consumption of sweets and salty snacks. Results showed that home availability (sweets: ORadj: 4·76, 95 % CI: 4·32, 5·23; salty snacks: ORadj: 6·56, 95 % CI: 5·64, 7·61), allowing to consume (sweets: ORadj: 3·29, 95 % CI: 2·95, 3·67; salty snacks: ORadj: 3·41, 95 % CI: 2·98, 3·90) and rewarding with sweets/salty snacks (sweets: ORadj: 2·69, 95 % CI: 2·23, 3·24; salty snacks: ORadj: 4·34, 95 % CI: 3·57, 5·28) ‘sometimes/or less frequently’ compared to ‘always/or often’ were associated with lower weekly consumption of sweets and snacks. Parents’ disagreement compared to agreement with deterministic health beliefs and inattentive eating were associated with lower consumption of salty snacks and sweets in children. Overall, the findings of this study indicate that attempts to promote healthy snacking habits in children should aim to improve parental dietary habits, food parenting practices, health beliefs, and reducing home availability of unhealthy foods and snacks.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Contribution of home availability, parental child-feeding practices and health beliefs on children’s sweets and salty snacks consumption in Europe: Feel4Diabetes-Study
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