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Association between overall fruit and vegetable intake, and fruit and vegetable sub-types and blood pressure: the PRIME study (Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2020

Nour A. Elsahoryi
Affiliation:
Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK
Charlotte E. Neville
Affiliation:
Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK
Christopher C. Patterson
Affiliation:
Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK
Gerry J. Linden
Affiliation:
Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK
Marie Moitry
Affiliation:
MONICA-Strasbourg, EA3430 Strasbourg, France
Katia Biasch
Affiliation:
MONICA-Strasbourg, EA3430 Strasbourg, France
Frank Kee
Affiliation:
Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK
Philippe Amouyel
Affiliation:
MONICA-Lille, INSERM U744, Lille, France
Vanina Bongard
Affiliation:
MONICA-Toulouse, INSERM UMR1027, Toulouse, France
Jean Dallongeville
Affiliation:
MONICA-Lille, INSERM U744, Lille, France
Jean Ferrières
Affiliation:
MONICA-Toulouse, INSERM UMR1027, Toulouse, France
Jayne V. Woodside*
Affiliation:
Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BJ, UK
*
*Corresponding author: Professor Jayne Woodside, email j.woodside@qub.ac.uk

Abstract

Increased fruit and vegetable (FV) intake is associated with reduced blood pressure (BP). However, it is not clear whether the effect of FV on BP depends on the type of FV consumed. Furthermore, there is limited research regarding the comparative effect of juices or whole FV on BP. Baseline data from a prospective cohort study of 10 660 men aged 50–59 years examined not only the cross-sectional association between total FV intake but also specific types of FV and BP in France and Northern Ireland. BP was measured, and dietary intake assessed using FFQ. After adjusting for confounders, both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were significantly inversely associated with total fruit, vegetable and fruit juice intake; however, when examined according to fruit or vegetable sub-type (citrus fruit, other fruit, fruit juices, cooked vegetables and raw vegetables), only the other fruit and raw vegetable categories were consistently associated with reduced SBP and DBP. In relation to the risk of hypertension based on SBP >140 mmHg, the OR for total fruit, vegetable and fruit juice intake (per fourth) was 0·95 (95 % CI 0·91, 1·00), with the same estimates being 0·98 (95 % CI 0·94, 1·02) for citrus fruit (per fourth), 1·02 (95 % CI 0·98, 1·06) for fruit juice (per fourth), 0·93 (95 % CI 0·89, 0·98) for other fruit (per fourth), 1·05 (95 % CI 0·99, 1·10) for cooked vegetable (per fourth) and 0·86 (95 % CI 0·80, 0·91) for raw vegetable intakes (per fourth). Similar results were obtained for DBP. In conclusion, a high overall intake of fruit, vegetables and fruit juice was inversely associated with SBP, DBP and risk of hypertension, but this differed by FV sub-type, suggesting that the strength of the association between FV sub-types and BP might be related to the type consumed, or to processing or cooking-related factors.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

These authors are joint first authors.

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Association between overall fruit and vegetable intake, and fruit and vegetable sub-types and blood pressure: the PRIME study (Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction)
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