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The association between meat consumption and the metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study and meta-analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 August 2021

Khemayanto Hidayat
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China
Wan-Zhan Zhu
Affiliation:
Suzhou Industrial Park Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Suzhou 215021, People’s Republic of China
Si-Min Peng
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China
Jin-Jin Ren
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China
Meng-Lan Lu
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China
Hai-Peng Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, People’s Republic of China
Jia-Ying Xu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China
Hui Zhou
Affiliation:
Suzhou Industrial Park Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Suzhou 215021, People’s Republic of China
Lu-Gang Yu*
Affiliation:
Suzhou Industrial Park Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Suzhou 215021, People’s Republic of China
Li-Qiang Qin*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, People’s Republic of China
*
*Corresponding authors: Li-Qiang Qin, email qinliqiang@suda.edu.cn; Lu-Gang Yu, email ylg@sipcdc.com
*Corresponding authors: Li-Qiang Qin, email qinliqiang@suda.edu.cn; Lu-Gang Yu, email ylg@sipcdc.com

Abstract

The findings regarding the associations between red meat, fish and poultry consumption, and the metabolic syndrome (Mets) have been inconclusive, and evidence from Chinese populations is scarce. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the associations between red meat, fish and poultry consumption, and the prevalence of the Mets and its components among the residents of Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou, China. A total of 4424 participants were eligible for the analysis. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the OR and 95 % CI for the prevalence of the Mets and its components according to red meat, fish and poultry consumption. In addition, the data of our cross-sectional study were meta-analysed under a random effects model along with those of published observational studies to generate the summary relative risks (RR) of the associations between the highest v. lowest categories of red meat, fish and poultry consumption and the Mets and its components. In the cross-sectional study, the multivariable-adjusted OR for the highest v. lowest quartiles of consumption was 1·23 (95 % CI 1·02, 1·48) for red meat, 0·83 (95 % CI 0·72, 0·97) for fish and 0·93 (95 % CI 0·74, 1·18) for poultry. In the meta-analysis, the pooled RR for the highest v. lowest categories of consumption was 1·20 (95 % CI 1·06, 1·35) for red meat, 0·88 (95 % CI 0·81, 0·96) for fish and 0·97 (95 % CI 0·85, 1·10) for poultry. The findings of both cross-sectional studies and meta-analyses indicated that the association between fish consumption and the Mets may be partly driven by the inverse association of fish consumption with elevated TAG and reduced HDL-cholesterol and, to a lesser extent, fasting plasma glucose. No clear pattern of associations was observed between red meat or poultry consumption and the components of the Mets. The current findings add weight to the evidence that the Mets may be positively associated with red meat consumption, inversely associated with fish consumption and neutrally associated with poultry consumption.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

These authors contributed equally to this work.

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