Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-n7x5d Total loading time: 0.305 Render date: 2021-11-28T23:59:06.346Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Adjunctive vitamin A and D for the glycaemic control in patients with concurrent type 2 diabetes and tuberculosis: a randomised controlled trial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2021

Ke Xiong
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071, People’s Republic of China
Jinyu Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071, People’s Republic of China
Aiguo Ma*
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071, People’s Republic of China
*
*Corresponding author: Aiguo Ma, email magfood@qdu.edu.cn

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of vitamin A, D and their interaction on the glycaemic control in patients with both diabetes and tuberculosis. Tuberculosis infection and its treatment induce hyperglycaemia and complicate the glycaemic control in patients with diabetes. A randomised controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design was conducted in a tuberculosis-specialised hospital in Qingdao, China. A total of 279 patients who have both diabetes and tuberculosis were included in this analysis. The patients received standard anti-tuberculosis treatment alone (control group), or together with a dose of vitamin A (600 μg RAE/d) or vitamin D (10 μg/d) or a combination of vitamin A (600 μg RAE/d) and vitamin D (10 μg/d) for 2 months. The effects of the intervention on fasting plasma glucose and 2-h postprandial blood glucose were investigated by ANCOVA. The analysis was adjusted for baseline values, age, sex, smoking, drinking and antidiabetic treatment as covariates. No significant effect was observed for vitamin A and D supplementation on fasting plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial blood glucose, BMI and related blood parameters. No interaction was observed between vitamin A and D supplementation for these endpoints. Vitamin A and D supplementation showed a null effect on the glycaemic control for patients with concurrent diabetes and tuberculosis. Future work should evaluate the effect of vitamin A and D supplementation on insulin-related indices for these patients and investigate the effect of vitamin D receptor genotypes.

Type
Full Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

World Health Organization (2018) Global Tuberculosis Report 2018. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar
Jeon, CY & Murray, MB (2008) Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of active tuberculosis: a systematic review of 13 observational studies. PLoS Med 5, 10911101.Google ScholarPubMed
Syal, K, Srinivasan, A & Banerjee, D (2015) VDR, RXR, Coronin-1 and Interferonγ Levels in PBMCs of Type-2 Diabetes Patients: molecular Link between Diabetes and Tuberculosis. Indian J Clin Biochem 30, 323328.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Anand, PK & Kaul, D (2005) Downregulation of TACO gene transcription restricts mycobacterial entry/survival within human macrophages. FEMS Microbiol Lett 250, 137144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, MA, Harries, AD, Jeon, CY, et al. (2011) The impact of diabetes on tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a systematic review. BMC Med 9, 15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Riza, AL, Pearson, F, Ugarte-Gil, C, et al. (2014) Clinical management of concurrent diabetes and tuberculosis and the implications for patient services. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2, 740753.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oluboyo, PO & Erasmus, RT (1990) The significance of glucose intolerance in pulmonary tuberculosis. Tubercle 71, 135138.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Niazi, AK & Kalra, S (2012) Diabetes and tuberculosis: a review of the role of optimal glycemic control. J Diabetes Metab Disord 11, 28.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Xiong, K, Wang, J, Zhang, J, et al. (2020) Association of dietary micronutrient intake with pulmonary tuberculosis treatment failure rate: a cohort study. Nutrients 12, 2491.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xiong, K, Wang, J, Kang, T, et al. (2020) Effects of resistant starch on glycaemic control: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Nutr 129.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
George, PS, Pearson, ER & Witham, MD (2012) Effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycaemic control and insulin resistance: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Diabet Med 29, E142E150.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Li, XY, Liu, Y, Zheng, YD, et al. (2018) The effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrients 10, 15.Google ScholarPubMed
Dawson-Hughes, B, Staten, MA, Knowler, WC, et al. (2020) Intratrial exposure to vitamin D and new-onset diabetes among adults with prediabetes: a secondary analysis from the vitamin d and type 2 diabetes (D2d) study. Diabetes Care 43, 29162922.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pittas, AG, Dawson-Hughes, B, Sheehan, P, et al. (2019) Vitamin D supplementation and prevention of type 2 diabetes. N Engl J Med 381, 520530.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Martin, M, Gallego-Llamas, J, Ribes, V, et al. (2005) Dorsal pancreas agenesis in retinoic acid-deficient Raldh2 mutant mice. Dev Biol 284, 399411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ostrom, M, Loffler, KA, Edfalk, S, et al. (2008) Retinoic acid promotes the generation of pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells and their further differentiation into beta-Cells. PLoS One 3, e2841.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brun, P-J, Grijalva, A, Rausch, R, et al. (2015) Retinoic acid receptor signaling is required to maintain glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and β-cell mass. FASEB J 29, 671683.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trasino, SE, Benoit, YD & Gudas, LJ (2015) Vitamin A deficiency causes hyperglycemia and loss of pancreatic beta-cell mass. J Biol Chem 290, 14561473.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Krempf, M, Ranganathan, S, Ritz, P, et al. (1991) Plasma vitamin A and E in type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) adult diabetic patients. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 61, 3842.Google Scholar
Danquah, I, Dobrucky, CL, Frank, LK, et al. (2015) Vitamin A: potential misclassification of vitamin A status among patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in urban Ghana. Am J Clin Nutr 102, 207214.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beydoun, MA, Shroff, MR, Chen, X, et al. (2011) Serum antioxidant status is associated with metabolic syndrome among US adults in recent national surveys. J Nutr 141, 903913.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ribel-Madsen, R, Friedrichsen, M, Vaag, A, et al. (2009) Retinol-Binding protein 4 in twins regulatory mechanisms and impact of circulating and tissue expression levels on insulin secretion and action. Diabetes 58, 5460.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Erikstrup, C, Mortensen, OH, Nielsen, AR, et al. (2009) RBP-to-retinol ratio, but not total RBP, is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Obes Metab 11, 204212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, J, Xiong, K, Wang, Q, et al. (2020) Adjunctive vitamin A and D during pulmonary tuberculosis treatment: a randomized controlled trial with a 2×2 factorial design. Food Funct 11, 46724681.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xiong, K, Wang, J, Zhang, B, et al. (2021) Vitamins A and D fail to protect against tuberculosis-drug-induced liver injury: a post hoc analysis of a previous randomized controlled trial. Nutrition 86, 111155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chinese Nutrition Society (2013) Dietary reference intake for Chinese residents 2013. Beijing: Science Press.Google Scholar
Yang, Y (2018) China Food Composition Tables, 6th ed. Beijing: Peking University Medical Press.Google Scholar
Zhou, QG, Hou, FF, Guo, ZJ, et al. (2008) 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D improved the free fatty-acid-induced insulin resistance in cultured C2C12 cells. Diabetes Metab Res Rev 24, 459464.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sadek, KM & Shaheen, H (2014) Biochemical efficacy of vitamin D in ameliorating endocrine and metabolic disorders in diabetic rats. Pharm Biol 52, 591596.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bland, R, Markovic, D, Hills, CE, et al. (2004) Expression of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3–1 α -hydroxylase in pancreatic islets. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 89, 121125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Xiong et al. supplementary material

Table A1

Download Xiong et al. supplementary material(File)
File 20 KB
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Adjunctive vitamin A and D for the glycaemic control in patients with concurrent type 2 diabetes and tuberculosis: a randomised controlled trial
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Adjunctive vitamin A and D for the glycaemic control in patients with concurrent type 2 diabetes and tuberculosis: a randomised controlled trial
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Adjunctive vitamin A and D for the glycaemic control in patients with concurrent type 2 diabetes and tuberculosis: a randomised controlled trial
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *