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Advocacy in Pain Management: The Role of the Anaesthetic Nurse Specialist

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 October 2013

G. McLean
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Medical Biology Centre, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK
D. Martin*
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Medical Biology Centre, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK
A. Cousley
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Medical Biology Centre, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK
L. Hoy
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Medical Biology Centre, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK
*Corresponding
Correspondence to: D. Martin, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Medical Biology Centre, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, UK. Tel: 02890972389; Fax: 02890972328; E-mail: d.s.martin@qub.ac.uk

Abstract

Peri-operative nursing practice is constantly changing and demanding specialist knowledge, skills and expertise to embrace these changes. All patients in need of anaesthesia are entitled to the same high quality peri-operative care and therefore those assisting the anaesthetist must be competent and effective practitioners. With this in mind the authors shall give a reflective account highlighting the role of Anaesthetic Nurse Specialist (ANS) in promoting leadership within the peri-operative environment and how it can be nurtured and facilitated to achieve professional autonomy and promote patient advocacy.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association of Anaesthetic and Recovery Nursing 2013 

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