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Selected Issues in Modelling Mortality by Cause and in Small Populations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2011

S. J. Richards
Affiliation:
4 Caledonian Place, Edinburgh, EH11 2AS, U.K. Telephone: +44 (0)131 315 4470; E-mail: stephen@richardsconsulting.co.uk; Web: www.richardsconsulting.co.uk

Abstract

Actuarial practice as regards mortality analysis and projection is changing rapidly. This paper provides a short introduction to some of the limitations and risks in using trends in cause of death as a means for projecting future mortality rates. It also covers recent developments in analysing the mortality of smaller populations, including survival models and “piggyback” models.

Type
Sessional meetings: papers and abstracts of discussions
Copyright
Copyright © Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2009

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