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Discussion Held by the Institute of Actuaries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2011

Extract

Mr J. B. Orr, F.F.A. (introducing the Steering Group paper): I will take you through some of the background to the scoping study work, the mortality research that was involved, and describe the steering group. Dr Macdonald will talk you through the scoping study. I will talk about the methodology that has been adopted and about an experts' meeting that we held in March. I will provide a brief description of the sessional meeting, and then talk about the October 2009 conference, which we are working towards.

Type
Sessional meetings: papers and abstracts of discussions
Copyright
Copyright © Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2009

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Discussion Held by the Institute of Actuaries
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