Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59df476f6b-6b5bh Total loading time: 0.189 Render date: 2021-05-18T18:36:58.053Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Distribution and abundance of forest birds in low-altitude habitat on Hawai'i Island: evidence for range expansion of native species

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 June 2006

CALEB S. SPIEGEL
Affiliation:
Current Address: USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, 3200 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, OR 97331, U.S.A Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center — U.S. Geological Survey, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, Department of Botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822-2279, U.S.A
PATRICK J. HART
Affiliation:
Current Address: Department of Biology, University of Hawaii at Hilo, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720, U.S.A Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center — U.S. Geological Survey, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, Department of Botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822-2279, U.S.A
BETHANY L. WOODWORTH
Affiliation:
Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center — U.S. Geological Survey, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A
ERIK J. TWEED
Affiliation:
Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center — U.S. Geological Survey, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, Department of Botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822-2279, U.S.A
JAYMI J. LeBRUN
Affiliation:
Current Address: 1260 Bay Shore Road, Brussels, WI 54204, U.S.A Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center — U.S. Geological Survey, Kilauea Field Station, P. O. Box 44, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, U.S.A Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, Department of Botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822-2279, U.S.A
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

The Hawaiian honeycreepers are thought to be limited primarily to middle- and high-altitude wet forests due to anthropogenic factors at lower altitudes, especially introduced mosquitotransmitted avian malaria. However, recent research has demonstrated that at least one native species, the Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens), is common in areas of active malaria transmission. We examined the current distribution and abundance of native and exotic forest birds within approximately 640 km2 of low-altitude (0–326 m) habitat on south-eastern Hawai'i Island, using roadside variable circular plot (VCP) at 174 stations along eight survey transects. We also re-surveyed 90 stations near sea level that were last surveyed in 1994–1995. Overall, introduced species were more abundant than natives; 11 exotic species made up 87% of the total individuals detected. The most common exotic passerines were Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus), House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) and Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Two native species, Hawai'i 'Amakihi and 'Apapane (Himatione sanguina), comprised 13% of the bird community at low altitudes. Hawai'i 'Amakihi were the most common and widespread native species, being found at 47% of stations at a density of 4.98 birds/ha (95% CI 3.52–7.03). 'Amakihi were significantly associated with 'ohi'a (Metrosideros polymorpha)-dominated forest. 'Apapane were more locally distributed, being found at only 10% of stations. Re-surveys of 1994–1995 transects demonstrated a significant increase in 'Amakihi abundance over the past decade. This work demonstrates a widespread recovery of Hawai'i 'Amakihi at low altitude in southeastern Hawai'i. The changing composition of the forest bird community at low-altitudes in Hawai'i has important implications for the dynamics of avian malaria in low-altitude Hawai'i, and for conservation of Hawai'i's lowland forests.

Type
Articles
Copyright
BirdLife International 2006
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Distribution and abundance of forest birds in low-altitude habitat on Hawai'i Island: evidence for range expansion of native species
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Distribution and abundance of forest birds in low-altitude habitat on Hawai'i Island: evidence for range expansion of native species
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Distribution and abundance of forest birds in low-altitude habitat on Hawai'i Island: evidence for range expansion of native species
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *