Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-dksz7 Total loading time: 0.315 Render date: 2021-08-02T12:18:55.076Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Discovery of an important wintering site of the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaea in the Meghna Estuary, Bangladesh

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2017

SAYAM U. CHOWDHURY
Affiliation:
Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project, House # 16/C (Flat # 501), Tallabag, Sobhanbag, Dhaka – 1207, Bangladesh.
MOHAMMAD FOYSAL
Affiliation:
Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project, House # 16/C (Flat # 501), Tallabag, Sobhanbag, Dhaka – 1207, Bangladesh.
M ABDULLAH ABU DIYAN
Affiliation:
Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project, House # 16/C (Flat # 501), Tallabag, Sobhanbag, Dhaka – 1207, Bangladesh.
SAKIB AHMED
Affiliation:
Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project, House # 16/C (Flat # 501), Tallabag, Sobhanbag, Dhaka – 1207, Bangladesh.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

The Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaeus is one of the most threatened migratory shorebirds in the world, breeding in Russia and wintering in Asia. The global population is declining rapidly and is projected to be extinct within a few decades without intervention. Here, we present the results of shorebird surveys in previously unrecognised site in Bangladesh along the Meghna Estuary, identified for the first time by using species distribution models. Counts and habitat preference of Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other endangered shorebirds are described here with notes on the global importance of the newly discovered site. The sum of the peak counts for each shorebird species across the two surveys was 25,993 including a minimum of 48 Spoon-billed Sandpipers. The majority of the Spoon-billed Sandpipers were observed during low tide while foraging (66.6%) and logistic regression testing for effects on the presence of foraging Spoon-billed Sandpiper indicate that they mainly preferred to forage on shallow mud. We summarise the threats to Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other birds in the new site that is currently not recognized as a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention, although it fulfils several Ramsar Criteria. We also propose conservation and monitoring measures for long-term protection of the Spoon-billed Sandpiper and its habitat.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © BirdLife International 2017 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Amano, T., Székely, T., Koyama, K., Amano, H. and Sutherland, W. J. (2010) A framework for monitoring the status of populations: an example from wader populations in the East Asian–Australasian flyway. Biol. Conserv. 143: 22382247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aziz, A., Barlow, A. C., Greenwood, C. C. and Islam, A. (2013) Prioritizing threats to improve conservation strategy for the tiger Panthera tigris in the Sundarbans Reserve Forest of Bangladesh. Oryx 47: 510518.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bamford, M., Watkins, D., Bancroft, W., Tischler, G. and Wahl, J. (2008) Migratory shorebirds of the East Asian-Australasian flyway: Population estimates and internationally important sites. Canberra, Australia: Wetlands International-Oceania.Google Scholar
Barter, M. (2002) Shorebirds of the Yellow Sea: importance, threats and conservation status. Canberra, Australia: Wetlands International-Oceania. (Wetlands International Global Series 9, International Wader Studies 12).Google Scholar
Bibby, C. J., Burgess, N. D., Hill, D. A. and Mustoe, S. H. (2000) Bird census techniques. Second edition. London, UK: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Bird, J. P., Lees, A. C., Chowdhury, S. U., Martin, R. and Haque, E. U. (2010) A survey of the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper Eurynorhynchus pygmeus in Bangladesh and key future research and conservation recommendations. Forktail 26: 18.Google Scholar
BirdLife International (2016) Important Bird and Biodiversity Area factsheet: Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta. Downloaded from http://www.birdlife.org on 08/05/2016Google Scholar
BOBLME. (2013) Marine Protected Areas in Bangladesh - a framework for establishment and management. Dhaka, Bangladesh: IUCN.Google Scholar
CCC (2009) Impact assessment of climate change and sea level rise on monsoon flooding. Dhaka, Bangladesh: Climate Change Cell, DoE, MoEF.Google Scholar
Chowdhury, S. U. (2010) Preliminary survey of shorebird hunting in five villages around Sonadia Island, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Birding Asia 16: 101102.Google Scholar
Chowdhury, S. U. (2011) A pictorial field guide to the shorebirds of Bangladesh. Dhaka, Bangladesh. Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project (BSCP).Google Scholar
Chowdhury, S. U. (2012) Survey and conservation of the critically endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper in Bangladesh. Ibis 154: 210211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chowdhury, S. U., Foysal, M., Das, D. K., Mohsanin, S., Diyan, M. A. A. and Alam, A. B. M. S. (2011) Seasonal occurrence and site use by shorebirds at Sonadia Island, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Wader Study Group Bull. 118: 7781.Google Scholar
Chowdhury, S. U., Diyan, M. A. A., Zöckler, C., Foysal, M., and Lemke, H. W. (2014) Shorebird survey sites along the coast of the Sundarbans, south-west Bangladesh. Stilt 66: 1013.Google Scholar
Chowdhury, S. U. and Foysal, M. (2016) Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project Annual Report. Dhaka, Bangladesh: Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project (BSCP).Google Scholar
Clark, N., Pain, D., and Green, R. (2014) Saving the Spoon-billed Sandpiper: an update on the conservation programme. British Birds 107: 467475.Google Scholar
Clark, N. A., Anderson, G. Q., Li, J., Syroechkovskiy, E. E., Tomkovich, P. S., Zöckler, C., ... and Green, R. E. (2016). First formal estimate of the world population of the Critically Endangered spoon-billed sandpiper Calidris pygmaea. Oryx 1-10. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0030605316000806.Google Scholar
Custodio, C. C. (1996) Conservation of migratory waterbirds and their wetland habitats in the Philippines. In Well, D. R. and Mundkur, T., eds. Conservation of migratory waterbirds and their wetland habitats in the East-Asian-Australasian Flyway. Proceedings of an International Workshop. Kushiro, Japan.Google Scholar
Erftemeijer, P. L. A. and Lewis, R. R. (2000) Planting mangroves on intertidal mudflats: habitat restoration or habitat conversion? Proceedings of the Ecotone VIII—enhancing coastal ecosystems restoration for the 21st century. Bangkok, Thailand: Royal Forest Department of Thailand.Google Scholar
Flint, V. E. and Kondratiev, A. Ya. (1977) An experience of evaluating of the total number of a rare stenotypic species (Spoon-billed Sandpiper Eurynorhynchus pygmeus as an example). P. 250 in Voinstvenski, M. A., ed. 7th All-Union Ornithol. Conf. Abstracts of talks. Part 2. Kiev, Naukova Dumka. (In Russian).Google Scholar
Grimmett, R., Inskipp, C., Inskipp, T. and Allen, R. (2011). Birds of the Indian subcontinent. London, UK: Christopher Helm.Google Scholar
Iftekhar, M. S. and Islam, M. R. (2004) Managing mangroves in Bangladesh: a strategy analysis. J. Coastal Conserv. 10: 139146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
International Resources Group (2012) State of Bangladesh’s Forest Protected Areas 2010. Dhaka, Bangladesh: Integrated Protected Area Co-Management (IPAC).Google Scholar
Islam, M., Mohammed, E. Y. and Ali, L. (2014) Economic incentives for sustainable hilsa fish management in Bangladesh: An analysis of the legal and institutional framework. IIED Working Paper. London, UK: IIED. http://pubs.iied.org/15523IIEDGoogle Scholar
Li, Z. W. D., Bloem, A., Delany, S., Martakis, G. and Quintero, J. O. (2009) Status of waterbirds in Asia - results of the Asian waterbird census: 1987-2007. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Wetlands International.Google Scholar
Ma, Z., Melville, D. S., Liu, J., Chen, Y., Yang, H., Ren, W., Zhang, Z., Piersma, T. and Li, B. (2014) Rethinking China’s new great wall. Science 346 (6212): 912.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MacKinnon, J., Verkuil, Y. I. and Murray, N. (2012) IUCN situation analysis on East and Southeast Asian intertidal habitats, with particular reference to the Yellow Sea (including the Bohai Sea). Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. (Occasional paper of the IUCN Species Survival Commission, 47).Google Scholar
Moores, N. (2012) The distribution, abundance and conservation of avian biodiversity in Yellow Sea habitats in the Republic of Korea. Unpublished PhD thesis. University of Newcastle, UK.Google Scholar
Murray, N. J., Clemens, R. S., Phinn, S. R., Possingham, H. P. and Fuller, R. A. (2014) Tracking the rapid loss of tidal wetlands in the Yellow Sea. Frontiers Ecol. Environ. 12: 267272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newing, H. (2010) Conducting research in conservation: social science methods and practice. Routledge.Google Scholar
Pain, D., Green, R. and Clark, N. (2011) On the edge: can the Spoon-billed Sandpiper be saved? British Birds 104: 350.Google Scholar
Papry, R. I. (2014) Status of coastal plantation in Chittagong Coastal Forest Division. IOSR J. Environ. Sci. Toxicol. Food Technol. 8: 7983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
R Core Team (2012) R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing. Vienna, Austria: R Foundation for Statistical Computing.Google Scholar
Raha, S. (2015) Fate of oil pollution in Bangladesh - a review. Asian J. Multidisciplinary Stud. 3(5).Google Scholar
Ramsar Convention Secretariat (2007) Designating Ramsar sites: The strategic framework and guidelines for the future development of the List of Wetlands of International Importance. Ramsar handbooks for the wise use of wetlands, 3rd edition, vol. 14. Gland, Switzerland: Ramsar Convention Secretariat.Google Scholar
Schemnitz, S. D., Batcheller, G. R., Lovallo, M. J., White, H. B. and Fall, M. W. (2009) Capturing and handling wild animals. Baltimore, Maryland: USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications.Google Scholar
Smith, B. D., Haque, A. A., Hossain, M. S. and Khan, A. (1998). River dolphins in Bangladesh: conservation and the effects of water development. Environ. Manage. 22: 323335.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, P. M., Chowdhury, S. U., Haque, E. U., Khan, M. M. H. and Halder, R. (2014). Notable bird records from Bangladesh from July 2002 to July 2013. Forktail 30: 5065.Google Scholar
TNC (2007) Conservation Action Planning handbook: Developing strategies, taking actions and measuring success at any scale. Arlington, USA: The Nature Conservancy.Google Scholar
Tomkovich, P. S., Syroechkovski, E. E. Jr, Lappo, E. G. and Zöckler, C. (2002) First indications of a sharp population decline in the globally threatened Spoon-billed Sandpiper Eurynorhynchus pygmeus. Bird Conserv. Internatn. 12: 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wetlands International (2016) Waterbird population estimates. Retrieved from wpe.wetlands.org on Saturday 31 December 2016.Google Scholar
Yee, A. T. K., Ang, W. F., Teo, S., Liew, S. C. and Tan, H. T. W. (2010) The present extent of mangrove forests in Singapore. Nature in Singapore 3: 139145.Google Scholar
Zöckler, C. and Bunting, G. C. (2006) Bangladesh 2006 Expedition Report. Unpublished report to the Deutsche Ornithologen Gesellschaft.Google Scholar
Zöckler, C., Syroechkovskiy, E. E., and Bunting, G. (2008) International Single Species Action Plan for the conservation of the Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmeus. On behalf of BirdLife International for the CMS.Google Scholar
Zöckler, C. Syroechkovskiy, E. E. and Atkinson, P. W. (2010a) Rapid and continued decline in the Spoon-billed Sandpiper Eurynorhynchus pygmeus indicates imminent extinction unless conservation action is taken. Bird Conserv. Internatn. 20: 95111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zöckler, C., Htin Hla, T., Clark, N., Syroechkovskiy, E., Yakushev, N., Daengphayon, S. and Robinson, R. (2010b) Hunting in Myanmar: a major cause of the decline of the Spoon-billed Sandpiper. Wader Study Group Bull. 117: 18.Google Scholar
Zöckler, C., Beresford, A. E., Bunting, G., Chowdhury, S. U., Clark, N. A., Fu, V. W. K. Hla, T. H., Morozov, V. V., Syroechkovskiy, E. E., Kashiwagi, M., Lappo, E. G., Tong, M., Long, T. L., Yu, Y., Huettmann, F., Akasofu, H. K., Tomida, H. and Buchanan, G. M. (2016) The winter distribution of the Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaeus. Bird Conserv. Internatn. 114.Google Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Chowdhury et al supplementary material 1

Chowdhury et al supplementary material

Download Chowdhury et al supplementary material 1(File)
File 23 KB
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Discovery of an important wintering site of the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaea in the Meghna Estuary, Bangladesh
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Discovery of an important wintering site of the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaea in the Meghna Estuary, Bangladesh
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Discovery of an important wintering site of the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaea in the Meghna Estuary, Bangladesh
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *