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Language research needs an “emotion revolution” and distributed models of the lexicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2008

CATHERINE L. CALDWELL-HARRIS*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Boston University, 64 Cummington St., Boston MA 02215, USAcharris@bu.edu

Extract

Pavlenko urges the community of language researchers to modify their conceptions of the mental lexicon, based on findings from bilingualism and emotions. She makes a compelling case. While reading her article, one can temporarily forget that in contemporary practice, emotion is not regarded as relevant to the theoretical question of the structure of the mental lexicon.

Type
Peer Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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