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A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive—Behaviour Therapy, Diazepam and Placebo in the Management of Generalized Anxiety

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2009

K. G. Power
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Stirling
D. W. A. Jerrom
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, Southmead General Hospital
R. J. Simpson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Stirling
M. J. Mitchell
Affiliation:
Astra Clinical Research Unit, Edinburgh
V. Swanson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology,University of Stirling

Abstract

Generalized anxiety patients were randomly allocated to Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy, Diazepam or Placebo and managed in a primary care setting. Treatments were balanced for degree of psychologist/patient contact. A range of outcome measures, including patient self report, psychologist assessor and general practitioner ratings were used. Large variations within group response to treatment emerged. At the end of active treatment the superiority of Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy was suggested. Post-study psychotropic prescription and psychological treatment was assessed at a 12-month follow-up. The Cognitive-Behaviour group revealed the lowest incidence of subsequent treatment interventions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 1989

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