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An evaluation of a group-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for low self-esteem

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2021

Samantha Swartzman
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, NHS Fife, Lynebank Hospital, Halbeath Road, Dunfermline KY11 8JH, UK University of Edinburgh, Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Health in Social Science, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, UK
Jenny Kerr
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, NHS Fife, Lynebank Hospital, Halbeath Road, Dunfermline KY11 8JH, UK
Rowena McElhinney
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, NHS Fife, Lynebank Hospital, Halbeath Road, Dunfermline KY11 8JH, UK
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

Self-esteem is a common factor in many mental health problems, including anxiety and depression. A cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based protocol called ‘Overcoming Low Self-Esteem’ is available; the use of this protocol in a group format has been associated with improvements in self-esteem. However, it is unclear whether improvements persist after the end of a group-based version of this programme.

Aims:

We aimed to assess whether changes in self-esteem, anxiety and depression persist 3 months after the end of a group version of the Overcoming Low Self-Esteem programme.

Method:

Using data from the National Health Service in Fife, Scotland, we analysed whether there were improvements on self-report measures of self-esteem, anxiety and depression from the beginning of the group to the end of the group and at a follow-up session 3 months later.

Results:

Significant improvements in self-esteem, anxiety and depression are maintained at 3 months follow-up.

Conclusions:

The Overcoming Low Self-Esteem group seems to be associated with improved self-esteem, anxiety and depression. However, further research from randomised controlled trials is needed to establish a causal link between the programme and improved psychological outcomes.

Type
Main
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies

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