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Comparing the Transfer Effects of Three Neurocognitive Training Protocols in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Single-Case Experimental Design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 December 2021

Da-Wei Zhang
Affiliation:
School of Educational Science, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, China Center for Place-Based Education, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, China Brain & Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
Stuart J. Johnstone*
Affiliation:
Brain & Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
Hui Li
Affiliation:
Peking University Sixth Hospital/Institute of Mental Health, Beijing, China National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders & Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), Beijing, China
Xiangsheng Luo
Affiliation:
Peking University Sixth Hospital/Institute of Mental Health, Beijing, China National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders & Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), Beijing, China
Li Sun*
Affiliation:
Peking University Sixth Hospital/Institute of Mental Health, Beijing, China National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders & Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), Beijing, China
*
*Corresponding author: Stuart J. Johnstone, School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia. E-mail: sjohnsto@uow.edu.au. Li Sun, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing 100191, China. E-mail: sunlioh@bjmu.edu.cn.
*Corresponding author: Stuart J. Johnstone, School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia. E-mail: sjohnsto@uow.edu.au. Li Sun, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing 100191, China. E-mail: sunlioh@bjmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The current study used behavioural and electroencephalograph measures to compare the transferability of three home-based interventions — cognitive training (CT), neurofeedback training (NFT), and CT combined with NFT — for reducing symptoms in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). Following a multiple-baseline single-case experimental design, twelve children were randomised to a training condition. Each child completed a baseline phase, followed by an intervention phase. The intervention phase consisted of 20 sessions of at-home training. Tau-U analysis and standardised visual analysis were adopted to detect effects. Results showed that CT improved inhibitory function and NFT improved alpha EEG activity and working memory. The combined condition, which was a reduced ‘dose’ of CT and NFT, did not show any improvements. The three conditions did not alleviate AD/HD symptoms. While CT and NFT may have transfer effects on executive functions, considering the lack of improvement in symptoms, this study does not support CT and NFT on their own as a treatment for children with AD/HD.

Type
Case Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy

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