Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6f6fcd54b-pzg5m Total loading time: 0.521 Render date: 2021-05-11T01:37:54.149Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: {}

Working memory retention systems: A state of activated long-term memory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 December 2003

Daniel S. Ruchkin
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Program in Neurosciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201
Jordan Grafman
Affiliation:
National Institutes of Health, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Bethesda, MD 20892 http://intra.ninds.hih.gov/Lab.asp?Org_ID=83
Katherine Cameron
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Washington College, Chestertown, MD 21620 http://faculty.washcoll.edu/bios/cameron_katherine.html
Rita S. Berndt
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Program in Neurosciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 http://neuroscience.umaryland.edu/faculty.asp?FacultyID=4

Abstract:

High temporal resolution event-related brain potential and electroencephalographic coherence studies of the neural substrate of short-term storage in working memory indicate that the sustained coactivation of both prefrontal cortex and the posterior cortical systems that participate in the initial perception and comprehension of the retained information are involved in its storage. These studies further show that short-term storage mechanisms involve an increase in neural synchrony between prefrontal cortex and posterior cortex and the enhanced activation of long-term memory representations of material held in short-term memory. This activation begins during the encoding/comprehension phase and evidently is prolonged into the retention phase by attentional drive from prefrontal cortex control systems. A parsimonious interpretation of these findings is that the long-term memory systems associated with the posterior cortical processors provide the necessary representational basis for working memory, with the property of short-term memory decay being primarily due to the posterior system. In this view, there is no reason to posit specialized neural systems whose functions are limited to those of short-term storage buffers. Prefrontal cortex provides the attentional pointer system for maintaining activation in the appropriate posterior processing systems. Short-term memory capacity and phenomena such as displacement of information in short-term memory are determined by limitations on the number of pointers that can be sustained by the prefrontal control systems.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Working memory retention systems: A state of activated long-term memory
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Working memory retention systems: A state of activated long-term memory
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Working memory retention systems: A state of activated long-term memory
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *