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When nurture becomes nature: Ethnocentrism in studies of human development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2010

David F. Lancy
Affiliation:
Program in Anthropology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322. David.Lancy@usu.edu http://www.usu.edu/anthro/davidlancyspages/index.html
Corresponding
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Abstract

This commentary will extend the territory claimed in the target article by identifying several other areas in the social sciences where findings from the WEIRD population have been over-generalized. An argument is made that the root problem is the ethnocentrism of scholars, textbook authors, and social commentators, which leads them to take their own cultural values as the norm.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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