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What's in a name change? Visual prediction makes extrapolation real and functional

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2008

Beena Khurana
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, East Sussex, BN1 9QH, United Kingdom.beenak@sussex.ac.ukhttp://www.sussex.ac.uk/psychology/profile116416.html

Abstract

Nijhawan redraws our attention to the problem of accurately perceiving an ever-changing visual world via a sensory system that has finite and significant communication times. The quandary is compelling and stark, but the suggestion that the visual system can compensate for these transmission delays by extrapolating the present is not so unequivocal. However, in this current airing of contradictory issues, accounts, and findings, Nijhawan trades spatial extrapolation – a rather specific concept introduced earlier (in Nijhawan 1994) for visual prediction – a far more expansive notion that forces the issue of both the perceived reality and functional significance of compensation.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright ©Cambridge University Press 2008

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References

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What's in a name change? Visual prediction makes extrapolation real and functional
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