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Warmth and competence as distinct dimensions of value in social emotions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2017

Mina Cikara*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. mcikara@fas.harvard.edu www.intergroupneurosciencelaboratory.com

Abstract

Gervais & Fessler's analysis collapses across two orthogonal dimensions of social value to explain contempt: relational value, predicted by cooperation, and agentic value, predicted by status. These dimensions interact to potentiate specific social emotions and behaviors in intergroup contexts. By neglecting the unique roles of these dimensions – and their associated attributes: warmth and competence – the sentiment framework cedes predictive precision.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

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