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Understanding gesture in sign and speech: Perspectives from theory of mind, bilingualism, and acting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2017

Usha Lakshmanan
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. usha@siu.edu zach.pilot@siu.edu
Zachary Pilot
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901. usha@siu.edu zach.pilot@siu.edu

Abstract

In their article, Goldin-Meadow & Brentari (G-M&B) assert that researchers must differentiate between sign/speech and gesture. We propose that this distinction may be useful if situated within a two-systems approach to theory of mind (ToM) and discuss how drawing upon perspectives from bilingualism and acting can help us understand the role of gesture in spoken/sign language.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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