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The role of exposure in emotional responses to music

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2008

E. Glenn Schellenberg
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6, Canadag.schellenberg@utoronto.cahttp://www.erin.utoronto.ca/~w3psygs/

Abstract

A basic aspect of emotional responding to music involves the liking for specific pieces. Juslin & Västfjäll (J&V) fail to acknowledge that simple exposure plays a fundamental role in this regard. Listeners like what they have heard but not what they have heard too often. Exposure represents an additional mechanism, ignored by the authors, that helps to explain emotional responses to music.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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