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Reputational concerns as a general determinant of group functioning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2016

Nadira S. Faber
Affiliation:
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3UD, United Kingdom nadira.faber@psy.ox.ac.uk nadirafaber.com Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3BD, United Kingdom julian.savulescu@philosophy.ox.ac.uk Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 1PT, United Kingdom www.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk
Julian Savulescu
Affiliation:
Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3BD, United Kingdom julian.savulescu@philosophy.ox.ac.uk Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 1PT, United Kingdom www.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk
Paul A. M. Van Lange
Affiliation:
Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands. pam.van.lange@psy.vu.nl www.paulvanlange.com

Abstract

To understand a group's (dys)functionality, we propose focusing on its members' concerns for their reputation. The examples of prosocial behavior and information exchange in decision-making groups illustrate that empirical evidence directly or indirectly suggests that reputational concerns play a central role in groups. We argue that our conceptualization fulfills criteria for a good theory: enhancing understanding, abstraction, testability, and applicability.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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