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Procedures and chronology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2011

Suzanne Chevalier-Skolnikoff
Affiliation:
California Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

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References

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