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“Negative emotions” live in stories, not in the hearts of readers who enjoy them

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2017

Vladimir J. Konečni*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109. vkonecni@ucsd.edu https://psychology.ucsd.edu/people/profiles/vkonecni.html

Abstract

The commendably ambitious project by Menninghaus et al. fails because its main connective tissue – “negative emotions” – is beyond the grasp of the authors' largely literary approach. The critique focuses on their treatment of the Paradox of Fiction, the neglect of the biological, adaptive nature of emotions, and the absence of convincing empirical support for key aspects of the proposed model.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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“Negative emotions” live in stories, not in the hearts of readers who enjoy them
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